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Leo Moser wrote:
> Thanks - Interesting.
> 
> There is a theory that no two words in any language 
> can ever be fully synonymous.  
> Yet I suppose they could be made so in a conlang.

I think numbers might be an exception, at least once you get past "one" 
and "two". For example, you can probably find at least one pair of 
languages where the word for "seven" in one language can invariably be 
translated with the same word in the other language and vice versa. Not 
all languages have a word for "seven", and some have more than one. 
Maybe the word for "seven" in some language also means "week". But if a 
language does have a single word for "seven" without any additional 
meaning, it's easy to imagine another language having a word with 
exactly the same meaning.

Another example might be "I" / "me" (complicated by the fact that many 
languages including English have more than one word for this meaning). 
It's possible that there could be two languages that both only have one 
word meaning "I" or "me", and that they mean exactly the same thing. 
Whatever language you're speaking, there's always a speaker (or the 
equivalent for written and signed languages).