Print

Print


Chang E, a beautiful maiden, also lives in the moon in Chinese stories.

Adam


On Thu, Aug 21, 2014 at 4:01 PM, Leo Moser <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Ingus Macats reports:
> > Fun fact, in Latvian mythology, the moon (Mēness) is a bald guy! 😊
>
> Does that imply respect -- as an elder perhaps?
> Or is it an amusing touch?
>
> The Chinese see a rabbit on the moon, of course, not a face. In most
> tales, the rabbit is worthy of considerable respect.
>
> Leo
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Ingus Macats
> Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 1:39 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Academic Semantics and Conlanging
>
> Fun fact, in Latvian mythology, the moon (Mēness) is a bald guy! 😊
>
>
>
>
>
>
> No: Leo Moser
> Nosūtīts: ‎ceturtdiena‎, ‎2014‎. gada ‎21‎. ‎augusts ‎22‎:‎56
> Kam: Constructed Languages List
>
>
>
>
>
> Let's take the word 'moon' -- it seems a rather clear referent.
>
>                 If we ignore verbal usages (both ancient and modern)
>
>                 If we restrict it to OUR moon, excluding satellites of
> other
>
>                                 planets, sub-planets, etc.
>
>                 If we leave out the phases, take it only as a FULL MOON.
>
>
>
> So there it is! -- the 'moon,' a rather clear semantic entity.
>
>
>
> Or is it? Do we always view it in the same way, as if the same thing?
>
>
>
> Jim Henry listed some possible attitudinal categories.
>
> Does the moon show these?
>
>                 affection: the smiley-faced moon, the moon that lights our
> way. . . .
>
>                 respect: the goddess Selene perhaps, or Chandra
>
>                 fear: as viewed by a werewolf perhaps
>
>                 amusement: that 'funny ol' moon,' etc.
>
>
>
> OR are there other categories?
>
> Such as:  useful,  useless,  harmful,  or end-in-itself.
>
>
>
> Is there any sense in showing attitude?
>
> There are lots of songs about the moon, showing various attitudes.
>
>
>
> LEO
>
>
>
>
>
>   Leo Moser
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Jim Henry
> Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 12:01 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Academic Semantics and Conlanging - was RE: "big" versus
> "large"
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 20, 2014 at 5:43 PM, Leo Moser < <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Do any of you have Conlangs in which the speaker's attitude toward the
> things that he/she mentions is reflected by an inflection pattern on the
> words?
>
>
>
> A sketchlang I worked on about six or seven years ago had attitude as an
> inflectional category on nouns.  I may have posted about it here on the
> list, but I don't have a web page about it.
>
>
>
> If I recall correctly, the attitudes marked by that category included
> affection, respect, fear, amusement, and two or three others.  This
> category was marked fusionally along with another category, I think
> "usefulness" -- useful, useless, harmful, or end-in-itself.
>
>
>
> --
>
> Jim Henry
>
>  <http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/> http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/
>
>  <http://www.jimhenrymedicaltrust.org> http://www.jimhenrymedicaltrust.org
>