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In the past week or so my 15 month old son began using the word cool.
I think it's quite the synchronicity that there is topic here about
the word. 

Anyhow, point being he doesn't use cool in the mojosa sense.
For instance he sat down into an inverted table,
and held onto one of the upended table legs,
noded and said "cool" while looking around.

how my son uses "cool" is more akin to "interesting", or "curious".
So it would be like  Lojban .a'u
or esperanto interesa, perhaps interesega or kurioza. 

In this particular instance Esperanto doesn't have a short word I'm
aware of. Indeed even mojosa is a trisyllable. 
Though Lojban's .a'u is practically a monosyllable. 

Mkaw aims to also have Lojban style emotive words,
though they  would of course be different,
due to the phonology and complexity steps.
i.e. more primitive emotions use more primitive vowels. 
.ai being pain,
.ia being pleasure,
the two most primitive emotions.
.aa being curiousity (baby's cool) more-desire
.ii being fear (eek) less-desire

though I'm considering switching .ii and .aa 
cause I read fear is a lower vibration than love/curiosity. 
also people often say aa when afraid. 

any opinions on the matter?


On Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 09:44:16AM -0700, Leo Moser wrote:
> I agree with Logan :
> English "cool" is a homograph, an ambiguous word, and also 
> very subject to erosion over time.
> 
> "Mojosa" is clearer. There are many cases where Esperanto, Ido, 
> etc., supply words that clarify messy English homographs and
> homophones.
> 
> That Esperanto, Ido, et al. are better than English in many way, 
> we all know.  That is one reason some of us are here.
> 
> Beat regards,               LEO
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: International Auxiliary Languages [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> On Behalf Of Logan Streondj
> Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 5:08 AM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: The Coolness of Esperantoland
> 
> I think mojosa is better than cool,
> it is more accurate to what it really means, "modern youth style". 
> 
> Often the modern youth have to make a new words for cool, hip, rad, etc.
> but mojosa can cross the generations, since it is so particular.
> 
> On Fri, Aug 29, 2014 at 01:05:48PM -0700, Leo Moser wrote:
> > Risto says
> > > In my opinion "cool" is a generic concept and it doesn't refer to 
> > > any particular culture or subculture.
> > 
> > Leo replies:
> > Yes, I suppose that most words can be made generic. But can this 
> > concept of "cool" ever have content in a generic sense.  Can it be 
> > universalized? What would its content be in the absence with another 
> > culture of a subset called youth-culture ?
> > 
> > When Zamenhof was a kid, was there a 'teenage culture'
> > that held certain things as 'cool'.  
> > 
> > The slang expression "cool" is a "culture specific" term. 
> > Does mojosega refer to a sub-set of enthusiasm among young 
> > Esperantists, that is totally without reference to the media output of 
> > Hollywood since 'talkies' began, with no reference to things or 
> > attitudes spread by English-language TV, having nothing to do with 
> > rock bands or the lyrics of songs originally in English . . . ?
> > 
> > Recently, a primitive tribe was contacted in for the first time in the 
> > Amazon. Do we expect that the kids there have their own sub-culture 
> > and a word meaning "cool"
> > in their vocabulary? 
> > 
> > A word for 'teenager' often did not exist in many languages until the 
> > English language media planted it -- along with a whole series of 
> > stereotypes about what teenagers were like and how they reacted to 
> > their elders.
> > 
> > Regards,            LEO
> > 
> >  Leo Moser
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: International Auxiliary Languages 
> > [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
> > On Behalf Of Risto Kupsala
> > Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 1:52 AM
> > To: [log in to unmask]
> > Subject: Re: The Coolness of Esperantoland
> > 
> > Leo, I think you are on the wrong track this time. In my opinion "cool" 
> > is a generic concept and it doesn't refer to any particular culture or 
> > subculture. See definitions in 
> > http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cool#Adjective
> > 
> > "7. (informal) In fashion, part of or fitting the in crowd; originally 
> > hipster slang."
> > 
> > Note the reference to the "in crowd". Who are the "in crowd"? 
> > Naturally there are lots of them, there's a different "in crowd" for every
> subculture.
> > Therefore the definition of "cool" is highly variable. 
> > Cultural revolution militants, Soviet pioneer groups, Islamic youth 
> > organizations and Esperantists, all of them have an "in crowd", so all 
> > of them have a distinct definition of "cool".
> > 
> > So "mojosa" doesn't point to the American culture. It's a 
> > context-specific word.
> > 
> > "Esperantujo estas mojosega loko, plena je mojosegaj samideanoj"
> > 
> > In cxi tia kunteksto "mojoseco" estas junula *esperanta* afero.
> > 
> > --Risto
> > 
> > 
> > Leo Moser wrote 2014-08-29 09:12:
> > > While Zamenhof never heard of it, 'mojosa' is a neo-Esperanto word 
> > > coined from the words moderna-juna-stilo (modern youth style). It 
> > > was specifically coined to equate to the colloquial English usage of 
> > > the word 'cool.'  Originally, I think, by a music group.
> > > 
> > > But what IS the 'modern youth style?' Something Esperantist?
> > > 
> > > No, hardly!
> > > 
> > > The 'cool' modern youth style of today is something that was created 
> > > via the world of jazz ( + the flappers and suffragettes), early 
> > > radio, Hollywood, related TV, MTV, the Beetles and 1000 music groups 
> > > during the 20th century, the Internet, etc. etc.
> > > 
> > > The 'concept of being cool' was not created by the Mao's "Cultural 
> > > Revolution," nor by Soviet "Pioneer Groups," nor by Islamic youth 
> > > organizations, nor by Esperantists, etc. It was 95% the result of 
> > > mass-media centered in the English language (including 
> > > Afro-American, Caribbean, etc. components.) Jeans, T-shirts, many 
> > > other things were also 'cool' and the life styles evolve. James 
> > > Dean, James Bond, Elvis, Madonna.
> > > 
> > > It is the mass-media, largely that in English, that tends to define 
> > > what is 'cool' today.
> > > 
> > > Esperanto never became 'cool' - it probably would be considered 
> > > downright 'nerdish' or 'uncool' by most youth if they heard of it.
> > > 
> > > Having coined a word for 'cool' does not make Esperanto 'cool.'
> > > 
> > > I don't mean to sound unkind or cynical. This is only being realistic.
> > > 
> > > Best regards to all,          LEO
> > > 
> > >   Leo Moser