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Ps given the prevalence of use of margarine all over Europe.

-----Original Message-----
From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Scott Villanueva-Hlad
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 11:31 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: oleomargarine

Thanks for the information. Based on this would you vote yea or nay on my use of oleo?

-----Original Message-----
From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Brown
Sent: Saturday, August 30, 2014 11:16 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: oleomargarine

From the Oxford English Dictionary:

 In U.S., oleomargarine, popularly oleo, is a recognized name of the commercial product, the expressed fat being distinguished as oleo-oil.
The name oléo-margarine was applied as early as 1854 by the French chemist Berthelot (Ann. Chim. Phys. XLI. 242 footnote) to a solid substance obtained c 1838 by Pelouze and Boudet (Comptes Rendus VII. 665) from olive oil, which was regarded as a combination of the oléine and ‘margarine’ of Chevreul and Berthelot. (See margarine.) According to the view then held, oléine, ‘margarine’, and stéarine, were regarded as the essential constituents of animal fat. As butter, or the fat of milk, consists according to Chevreul mainly of oléine and ‘margarine’, with a small amount of butyrin and allied principles, M. Mège-Mouriès in 1869–71 experimented on its artificial production by the extraction of the oléine and ‘margarine’ from animal fat, with subsequent processes for the addition of butyrin, etc. Hence the name oléo-margarine for the supposed combination of oléine and ‘margarine’ thus extracted. As further research has shown that neither the ‘margarine’ of Chevreul, nor the oléo-margarine of Berthelot are definite chemical substances, these names are no longer in chemical use, and ‘oleo-margarine’ has only a manufacturing or commercial use for the fatty substance described above, or (as in U.S.) for the artificial butter (margarine) made from it.


On Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 9:01 PM, Scott Villanueva-Hlad <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I am adding the word “margarine” to the Asirka lexicon. Asirka is a 
> language isolate in eastern Europe.  I remember my grandmother always 
> called margarine “oleo” which of course comes from “oleomargarine”.
> Using Google translate, I have checked every European language 
> available and with the exception of Icelandic (smjörlíki) all 
> languages use “margarine”. With that understanding, one could 
> reasonably expect Asirka to use a form of “margarine” as well. I can’t 
> in good conscience use the word “oleo” as much as I would like to. Can 
> anyone help me establish a resonable case that the word could be 
> “oleo” rather than “margarine”?
>
> Thank you in advance,
>
> SCotto
>