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In photoshop specifically any "shape" to include type is a vector graphic.
Great for logo design and digital media. I like to use vector graphics when
I am working with more cartoon graphics as well.
On Sep 19, 2014 4:21 PM, "Garth Wallace" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Fri, Sep 19, 2014 at 6:36 AM, Krista D. Casada <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> > I have similar problems. What precisely does a vector graphic editor do?
>
> Vector graphics are graphics where shapes are defined as sets of
> connected points, as opposed to raster graphics where an image
> consists of a grid of pixels (a "bitmap"). Photoshop is a raster
> graphics program (conventionally called a "paint program"), while
> Adobe Illustrator is an example of a vector graphics editor. The
> advantages of vector graphics are that they can be easily shrunk or
> blown up without any loss of quality, and lines are always straight
> and curves are always smooth (since they are created by mathematical
> functions rather than following the physical movement of a person's
> hand); the disadvantages are that they're less intuitive the use
> (using a "paintbrush" pointer is fairly easy to understand, but
> molding 2D objects is odd), and that it's very difficult to give an
> image an "organic" hand-drawn look (most vector graphics are
> relatively low on fine detail).
>
> Outline fonts, like PostScript and OpenType (most fonts these days)
> are essentially sets of vector graphics with some additional features.
>