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2014-09-10 19:52 GMT+02:00 Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>:

> Thank you, David and Jim, for the recommendations!
>
> BTW, I've been moving back and forth in relation to the insertion of line
> breaks inside my paragraphs. I think either can appear weird depending on
> each one's mail platform. Do you (all of this list) have any opinions about
> it?
>
> > Going further with my idea about 3-sexes species, I imagined one that
> would have both 2-sexed and 3-sexed types of reproduction that would
> generate disomic and trisomic individuals. The disomic ones would be
> smaller, and somewhat considered as fruit of "incomplete" reproduction.
> However, in some times, people want to reproduce faster than they can join
> in trios, and then small people get more numerous, what is enhancing by the
> fact that two disomic people only produce disomic children.
>
> Here, I actually meant that disomic people can only join in pairs among
> themselves...
>
> > The possible types of genetic codes would be, using a XY notation
> analogous to those of human sexual cromossomes, the following: XXX
> (female), XXY (female/conveyor), XYY (male), XX (female/conveyor), XY
> (male) and YY (male).
>
> ... because these XX people are purely female among disomic people but
> they can outsource their pregnancy to a trisomic pure female XXX (the only
> ones who can give birth to trisomic people).
>
> In a fiction I just imagined, at a given point in time, disomic people
> starts getting discriminated by trisomic people in a somy-mixed society
> (that had been mixed since the beggining of time) and eventually run away
> to found a purely disomic city, hiding the very existence of trisomic
> people from their children from then on...
>
> I hope this not to be exactly the premise of another book with 3-sexed
> species, such as "The God Themselves". If it is, my Nobel Prize in
> Literature is lost.
>


I've just finished reading the second part of "The Gods Themselves" (cited
here by MorphemeAddict and Logan Kearsley) and seen that it is very
different from what I was describing here. Well, it's a great story! If he
hasn't won the Nobel Prize with that, probably it will not be me who will
win it...

Até mais!

Leonardo



> Até mais!
>
> Leonardo
>
> 2014-09-10 17:26 GMT+02:00 David McCann <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>> On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 01:47:31 +0200
>> Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> > Actually, I meant an introductory book *about* science fiction, not
>> > science fiction itself. I could be titled "A Brief Hystory of Science
>> > Fiction" or "An Introduction to the Universe of Science Fiction".
>> > That's an example of my preference towards non-fiction books.
>>
>> Ursula Le Guin's anthology "A fisherman of the inland sea" starts with
>> a 10 page essay "On not reading science fiction" which says all that
>> need be said. She writes in the "soft" category, as well as being
>> probably the best living US [SF] author.
>>
>
>
> 2014-09-10 5:48 GMT+02:00 Jim Henry <[log in to unmask]>:
>
>> c
>> On Tue, Sep 9, 2014 at 7:47 PM, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]
>>
>> > >> > Actually, I meant an introductory book *about* science fiction,
>> not science
>> > fiction itself. I could be titled "A Brief Hystory of Science Fiction"
>> or
>> > "An Introduction to the Universe of Science Fiction". That's an example
>> of
>> > my preference towards non-fiction books.
>>
>> A good online resource is the SF Encyclopedia:
>>
>> http://sf-encyclopedia.com/
>>
>> Start with the broad theme entries, probably, and follow links as you
>> find them interesting.
>>
>> http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/category/themes/theme
>>
>> For example, and  ObConlang, see:
>>
>> http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/linguistics
>>
>> James Gunn's series of anthologies _The Road to Science Fiction_
>> combines story reprints with historical and biographical essays on the
>> development of the genre and particular influential authors.  There
>> are several similar anthologies, e.g. by Gardner Dozois or David
>> Hartwell, or the older series of classic reprints titled _The Great SF
>> Stories_ of various years, edited by Asimov and Greenberg.
>>
>> For pure nonfiction, literary criticism, I've heard good things about
>> Brian Aldiss' _Trillion Year Spree_ and Thomas Disch's _The Dreams our
>> Stuff is Made Of_, and several of James Gunn's nonfiction books.
>>
>> http://www.sfcenter.ku.edu/bio.htm
>>
>> For the early history of the science fiction community, Frederik
>> Pohl's _The Way the Future Was_ is a fascinating memoir, and the blog
>> he wrote in the last few years of his life reprinted and expanded that
>> book.
>>
>> --
>> Jim Henry
>> http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/
>> http://www.jimhenrymedicaltrust.org
>>
>>