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Paul Bartlett skrev den 2014-12-25 
22:38:
> Dan Holodek, who occasionally 
> posts on the Sona language group 
> at Yahoo Groups (not very 
> active), has created an 
> introduction and four lessons (so 
> far). Whether these lessons are a 
> "finished product" he has not 
> said, but he had made them 
> available publicly. Some people 
> like to have a single document 
> for studying or printing, so I 
> combined Holodek's public lessons 
> into a single document with 
> running page numbers (currently 1 
> - 31). It should print out 
> correctly on either US Letter or 
> A5. Because this is someone 
> else's work, I cannot vouch for 
> the accuracy of it, and HE 
> RETAINS THE RIGHT TO CHANGE 
> AND/OR SUPERSEDE ANYTHING. I am 
> just posting this as a 
> convenience for someone who wants 
> a single file created from 
> publicly available information. 
> For the latest information, see 
> the Sona language group at Yahoo. 
> What I have may not be the most 
> current or accurate versions.
>
> http://www.panix.com/~bartlett/Sona_book_scan.pdf 
> (~11.9MB)
> http://www.panix.com/~bartlett/Sona_Lessons.pdf 
> (~128KB)
In my experience yet another 
"Kotava", but chronologically Sona 
comes first and then Staren 
Fetcey's Kotava. I understand the 
propency for aprioristic languages 
as some kind of psychological 
thing. It reminds me of the 
examples of mind-mapping some 
lecturers used to sell to me in the 
70's. Yo draw lines on a blackboard 
or paper uniting different things, 
mainly your own associations. The 
thing is just that "your" 
associations are not "mine". And I 
think apriori languages work in the 
same way. The form of the language 
is evident, intelligible to the 
inventor, but how about others? It 
doesn't work on me, though.

In this sense Volapük and Urópi are 
hanging in a way in the middle. I 
can to a certain extent understand 
how Schleyer and Landais may have 
been thinking, but I cannot 
understand what analogy to use when 
trying to create vocabulary on my own.

In this way IALA's Interlingua is a 
good model, as youu can understand 
the mechanics of the language. The 
negative side is that too few takes 
the pain to understand them.

Kjell R