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On Sun, 1 Feb 2015 21:15:37 -0700, Logan Kearsley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On 1 February 2015 at 16:08, J S Jones <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> In Jan24, I have bivalent predicates instead of verbs, adjectives, nouns, and prepositions. All of these can take a person-number prefix (for the more agent-like argument) and a person-number suffix (for the more patient-like argument). However, these can be 0. When an affix is 0, there's a default value depending on the predicate stem's class. The values are 3AnimS (A), 3InanS (I), and Null (U). There are 6 classes WRT default person-number:
>>
>> A--I: most transitive situations, body parts;
>> A--U: agentive situations, animate entities;
>> U--I: scalar and other patientive situations, inanimate entities;
>> U--U: impersonal situations;
>> A--A: words like "give" & "tell", kinship, some derived stems, such as "school of fish";
>> I--I: some derived stems, such as "grove of trees" and "peel of fruit";
>>
>> The stem also determines other things, such as the argument roles.
>>
>> What I'm trying to come up with are a name and single-letter abbreviation for each class. Let me know what's not clear.
>
>What other parts of speech are there? How do you form complete
>clauses? Can there be more than one of these stems per clause, and if
>so, how are they combined?
>Since there tends to be correlation between semantic classes (as
>you've laid out here) and syntactic classes, I'm thinking it might
>make sense to derive at least some of the class names from the
>syntactic roles that they most typically occupy, if there is in fact
>any way to distinguish them.
>
>-l.

The other word classes are pronouns, quantity words, determiners, conjunctions, case prepositions, and other particles. The first 2 of these can be inflected (pronouns are like predicates but are univalent). A predicate or pronoun form can constitute a clause by itself; otherwise, the first acts as the head of the clause, with the others organized into phrases (the case prepositions and determiners help there). Non-head predicates and pronouns must be marked as having a 3rd person argument. I'll have to come up with some examples later.

Jeff