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Doesn't @source on lem meant it's a conjecture? It must be if there's no witness, no?

Sent from my phone. 

> On May 3, 2015, at 14:54, Burghart Marjorie <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Thank you all for your contribution! 
> Yes indeed, the (a) was just to mark a footnote, sorry it was confusing. 
> 
> @Hugh, the solution you offer lets us print or display "conieci", but not represent the fact that there is a conjecture here, and also the factual link between the reading in the Vulgate and the editor's hypothesis is less evident. 
> What about using the certainty element? Something like: 
> 
> <app>
>        <lem>meo<certainty cert="high" locus="value"><desc>uestro <title>Vulg.</title></desc></certainty></lem>
>        <rdg wit="#P #V #H #E"><abbr>m</abbr></rdg>
> </app>
> 
> What I like about the above is also that it would let us print or display the apparatus according to the age-old conventions of critical editions - something I am very attentive to maintain, even in born-digital editions. 
> 
> Any thoughts? It would be good to reach a community's agreement on the way to encode such very frequent phenomena in critical editions.
> 
> Best wishes, 
> Marjorie
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Mail original -----
> De: "Hugh Cayless" <[log in to unmask]>
> À: [log in to unmask]
> Envoyé: Dimanche 3 Mai 2015 20:07:25
> Objet: Re: Encoding conjecture in critical apparatus
> 
> Ah, that worries me much less then :-). Sorry for the confusion.
> 
> Nolite timere, pusillus grex, complacuit patri <app><lem source="#ed">meo</lem><note>conieci</note><rdg wit="#codd"><abbr>m<am>.</am></abbr></rdg><rdg wit="#Vulg">vestro</rdg></app> dare uobis regnum.
> 
> @source="#ed" indicates that the lemma is the editor’s own conjecture, #ed being a pointer to a bibl in sourceDesc, probably, since you’re encoding the edition. 
> 
> I’ll add that if you’re wanting to encode the form of the apparatus as printed in the text, then you probably want to do the apparatus as <notes> rather than (or in addition to) using <app>.
> 
>> On May 3, 2015, at 13:48 , Lou Burnard <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I think the (a) is a footnote indicator and nothing to do with the text.
>> 
>> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab®|PRO
>> 
>> 
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Hugh Cayless 
>> Date:05/03/2015 16:48 (GMT+00:00) 
>> To: [log in to unmask] 
>> Subject: Re: Encoding conjecture in critical apparatus 
>> 
>> I’m rather puzzled by this. Is meo(a) meant to convey that "mea" is a possible expansion of "m."? I don’t think that works at all in Latin, since "patri" is masculine, but I don’t see (without more context) how else to read it.
>> 
>> I’d probably do something like:
>> 
>> Nolite timere, pusillus grex, complacuit patri <app><lem source="#ed"><choice><seg cert="high">meo</seg><seg cert="low">mea</seg></choice></lem><rdg wit="#codd"><abbr>m<am>.</am></abbr></rdg><rdg wit="#Vulg">vestro</rdg></app> dare uobis regnum.
>> 
>> Perhaps "meo(a)" means something like "The only possible expansions of "m." are "meo" and "mea". I give the latter for completeness’ sake, but parenthesize it because it is impossible." In which case, I might do it differently. I might also restrict the <choice> only to o(a), depending on my encoding policy, so <lem>me<choice><seg cert="high>o</seg><seg cert="low">a</seg></choice></lem> or something like that.
>> 
>> Hope this helps…
>> 
>> Hugh
>> 
>>> On May 2, 2015, at 18:17 , Burghart Marjorie <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Dear all, 
>>> I would like to encode an existing critical edition, where this is found: 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Text: 
>>> Nolite timere, pusillus grex, complacuit patri meo(a) dare uobis regnum. 
>>> 
>>> Apparatus: 
>>> (a) meo] conieci, m. codd., uestro Vulg.
>>> 
>>> Some explanations: this means that the wor "meo" in the sentence is a conjecture of the editor ("conieci"). 
>>> All the manuscripts bear the same abbreviated reading, "m." ("m. codd."). 
>>> But this sentence is actually a biblical quotation, and in the Latun Bible, the Vulgate, the reading here is "uestro" ("uestro Vulg."). This is why the editor thinks "m."stands for "meo", i.e. also a pronoum but for a different person, which makes perfect sense. 
>>> 
>>> How would you guys encode this? 
>>> 
>>> Cheers, 
>>> Marjorie