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Nice! I really thought about ergative as something that exchanges subjects
and objects in a way, but I don't know anything about their conjugation.

Em 04/05/2015 20:03, "Siva Kalyan" <[log in to unmask]>
escreveu:
>
> In addition, some (non-ergative) languages use different verb stems for
plural objects than for singular objects. I can’t think of one off-hand,
but there are Native American languages that do this.
>
> Siva
>
> > On 5 May 2015, at 8:31 am, [log in to unmask] wrote:
> >
> > I recommend that you read about ergative languages — it sounds like
that's what you're moving toward.
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On May 5, 2015, at 00:12, Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:
> >>
> >> I'm considering a reform of Muai that would make it look* a little
like its
> >> verbs conjugate in agreement with the object instead of with the
subject.

What a mess I made! I have no idea of whether or not this whole sentence is
grammatical.

> >> Can you name some language with that type of conjugation?
> >>
> >> Até mais!
> >>
> >> Leonardo
> >>
> >> 2015-02-24 12:53 GMT-03:00 Leonardo Castro <[log in to unmask]>:
> >>
> >>> Hi, conlangers and sympathizers!
> >>>
> >>> I've been gathering dispersed products of some previous efforts on
being a
> >>> effective conlanger in order to build what will probably be my first
> >>> complete conlang. I call it "Muai" and intend to publish it gradually
as
> >>> real life leaves me free time.
> >>>
> >>> http://leolucas.conlang.org/muai.html
> >>>
> >>> I decided to rebuild its lexicon by defining its sound symbolism
first.
> >>> There's nothing deterministic about it. Building Muai words is still
an
> >>> art, I'm just using the following scheme as my palette.
> >>>
> >>> http://leolucas.conlang.org/muai-sounds.html
> >>>
> >>> Comments are welcome!
> >>>
> >>> Don't hesitate to correct my English usage and grammar.
> >>>
> >>> Até mais!
> >>>
> >>> Leonardo
> >>>