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Alex Fink wrote:
> On Wed, 1 Jul 2015 21:39:58 -0400, Herman Miller
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> ("Can't wait" is a syllable too long: "lymabakan". Those kinds of
>> reasons are why the Tirëlat translations don't always come close to
>> the English.)
> 
> Disney songs actually allow for a very practical calibration on this
> point.  The films get localised into dozens of different languages on
> release, and the song translations on the whole are of quite high
> quality; moreover, they're easy to find on Youtube.  I got a bunch
> just asking 
> https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=I+just+can%27t+wait+to+be+king+translation
> . Watching a bunch of these leaves me with the impression that the
> Tirëlat is the closest to the English of any of them, handily!  (For
> instance, I didn't see any of them go for a replication of the "main"
> / "mane" pun -- though conceivably they did and the translator missed
> it.)
> 
> I wonder why this is.  Is Tirëlat specially rich in allowable word
> choices or word order? Does it have fewer rhyme classes than the
> typical other target language? Or is it that Tirëlat hasn't developed
> much in the way of idiomatic wheel-ruts, so that where a lived-in
> language might reject a notionally grammatical phrasing just on
> account of awkwardness or infelicity, you don't?

Well, I do try to preserve as much of the original meaning as I can 
(whichever language I'm translating from). Disney's translators may have 
different criteria for making their translations (like trying to match 
the lip-syncing). And most likely, they're native speakers of the 
language, so they'll have a better grasp of the options. I've actually 
translated both the English and Japanese versions of "Let It Go" into 
Tirëlat, and they're like different songs. I think the Tirëlat versions 
share only two words, "saanrivits" (footprint) and "lĕxwynadan" (I'll test).

But it's a good point that I don't have a good sense of awkwardness like 
a native speaker would. I don't want to reject odd-sounding 
constructions that might be perfectly fine in Tirëlat, so I risk 
accepting a few phrases that a Tirëlat songwriter would never use.

It certainly strains credibility that anyone would ever use "rhanžał" 
(chin fur) as a pun for "rhjandi" (important). It might be better to 
leave it as "rhjandi tol", but at least I tried to work the pun in 
somehow. A lion's mane they'd probably just call a "beard" (pili), and 
"the main event" might be more idiomatically expressed as a "key" event 
(kjuli).