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On Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:39:16 +0200
Juanma Barranquero <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> PL1 is sort of a paucal, but not used to count few things, but
> "definite" numbers of things. PL2 is used when the number is neither
> known nor easily determinable.
> So, it's not really a singular / paucal / plural systems as much as
> singular / definite / indefinite.
> 
> Are there natlangs that do this? How would you refer to these
> plurals? How would you gloss them? And, more importantly: does it
> make sense, or it is waaaaay too artificial?
> 

As far as I know, there are no natural languages that do this. On the
other hand, it doesn't seem artificial. Languages do make distinctions
between the known and the unknown:
a book, the book
a book (one, but the number doesn't matter), one book
'o sa fafine "a woman", 'o le fafine "a/the woman" - known to me if not
to you (Samoan)
aliquis "somebody" - I don't know him, quidam "somebody" - I do know
him (Latin}

PL2 would obviously be called "plural". For PL1, how about
"numerative"? It express the sense of being numbered and (unlike, say,
"numerate") is not a word often used for anything else.