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I just met a nice tidy example of the 'interrupted list' discussed a
while
back. I believe that all four (five) of the options given below are not 
only valid but legitimate.

For our purposes, I would incline slightly to option number 2. 
(I do not supply the page image for this, since the structure is
quite clear.) Please pardon the untransformed upper-case SGML.

--pfs

1. The interrupted list with intervening <p>

<DIV2 TYPE="author">
<HEAD>MOSES,</HEAD>
<P>OF the Tribe of <HI>Levi,</HI> Governor and Legislator of the
Children of <HI>Israel:</HI> Born in <HI>Egypt,</HI> about the Year of
the World 2468. <HI>Ante Christ.</HI> 1571. brought the Children of
<HI>Israel</HI> out of <HI>Egypt,</HI> in the Year 2508. led them in the
Wilderness for 40 Years; dyed in the Year of the World, 2548. being 80
Years of Age. Page 61</P>
<LIST>
<HEAD>His Works still extant.</HEAD>
<ITEM><HI>Genesis.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Exodus.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Leviticus.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Numbers.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Deuteronomy.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
<P>These 5 Books are call'd the <HI>Pentateuch.</HI></P>
<LIST>
<ITEM><HI>The Nintieth Psalm.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
</DIV2>


2. The interrupted list within a superordinate <p>


<DIV2 TYPE="author">
<HEAD>MOSES,</HEAD>
<P>OF the Tribe of <HI>Levi,</HI> Governor and Legislator of the
Children of <HI>Israel:</HI> Born in <HI>Egypt,</HI> about the Year of
the World 2468. <HI>Ante Christ.</HI> 1571. brought the Children of
<HI>Israel</HI> out of <HI>Egypt,</HI> in the Year 2508. led them in the
Wilderness for 40 Years; dyed in the Year of the World, 2548. being 80
Years of Age. Page 61</P>
<P><LIST>
<HEAD>His Works still extant.</HEAD>
<ITEM><HI>Genesis.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Exodus.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Leviticus.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Numbers.</HI></ITEM>
<ITEM><HI>Deuteronomy.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
These 5 Books are call'd the <HI>Pentateuch.</HI>
<LIST>
<ITEM><HI>The Nintieth Psalm.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
</P>
</DIV2>


3. The nested list with description in <trailer>


<DIV2 TYPE="author">
<HEAD>MOSES,</HEAD>
<P>OF the Tribe of <HI>Levi,</HI> Governor and Legislator of the
Children of <HI>Israel:</HI> Born in <HI>Egypt,</HI> about the Year of
the World 2468. <HI>Ante Christ.</HI> 1571. brought the Children of
<HI>Israel</HI> out of <HI>Egypt,</HI> in the Year 2508. led them in the
Wilderness for 40 Years; dyed in the Year of the World, 2548. being 80
Years of Age. Page 61</P>
<LIST>
<HEAD>His Works still extant.</HEAD>
  <ITEM>
    <LIST>
    <ITEM><HI>Genesis.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Exodus.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Leviticus.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Numbers.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Deuteronomy.</HI></ITEM>
    <TRAILER>These 5 Books are call'd the <HI>Pentateuch.</HI></TRAILER>
    </LIST>
  </ITEM>
  <ITEM><HI>The Nintieth Psalm.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
</DIV2>



4. The nested list with description left loose in <item>

<DIV2 TYPE="author">
<HEAD>MOSES,</HEAD>
<P>OF the Tribe of <HI>Levi,</HI> Governor and Legislator of the
Children of <HI>Israel:</HI> Born in <HI>Egypt,</HI> about the Year of
the World 2468. <HI>Ante Christ.</HI> 1571. brought the Children of
<HI>Israel</HI> out of <HI>Egypt,</HI> in the Year 2508. led them in the
Wilderness for 40 Years; dyed in the Year of the World, 2548. being 80
Years of Age. Page 61</P>
<LIST>
<HEAD>His Works still extant.</HEAD>
  <ITEM>
    <LIST>
    <ITEM><HI>Genesis.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Exodus.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Leviticus.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Numbers.</HI></ITEM>
    <ITEM><HI>Deuteronomy.</HI></ITEM>
    </LIST>
  These 5 Books are call'd the <HI>Pentateuch.</HI>
  </ITEM>
  <ITEM><HI>The Nintieth Psalm.</HI></ITEM>
</LIST>
</DIV2>


5. (Option 5 would relegate the Pentateuch comment to a <note>, which
introduces
linking complications that I would prefer to ignore.)





On Thu, Aug 13, 2015, at 05:06, Saeed Sarrafzadeh wrote:
> Hi list members
> Thanks a lot for your advise
> But I want to make some points about your useful hints:
> >On 12/08/15 15:28, Frederik Elwert wrote:
> >> I think the issue was something like this:
> >>
> >>    <p>There are three kinds of things:</p>
> >>    <list>
> >>      <item>There is thing #1.</item>
> >>      <item>There is thing #2.</item>
> >>      <p>Some argue that #1 and #2 are actually the same thing.</p>
> >>      <item>Then there is thing3.</item>
> >>    </list>
> 
> 
> >> I think one way to solve this would be to use multiple lists. The
> >> problem is then expressing that the two lists are actually one list. I
> >> *think* one might go with @next/@prev, but I would be curious to hear
> >> oppinions on that:
> 
> I agree with your solution and I think that it's our one-and-only-one
> approach with the current situation because as James wrote:
> 
> On Wed, 12 Aug 2015 16:08:32 +0100, James Cummings
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> >I'd only use that if the single list was fragmented by some other
> >hierarchy I was more interested in at the time.
> 
>  I also think that the main purpose of @next and @previous attributes is
>  for non-hierarchical cases, although we can use them in such cases, but
>  is seems to be more logical to change the model when it's more
>  restrictive than the usual real cases. As I noted, the model is the
>  thing that should follow the real case and principal restrictions.
> 
> But about what James proposed:
> 
> >I think semantically this could also be considered is a list with
> >a nested list?
> >
> ><p>There are three kinds of things:</p>
> >   <list>
> >     <item>
> >	<list>
> >	 <item>There is thing #1.</item>
> >	 <item>There is thing #2.</item>
> >	</list>
> >  	<p>Some argue that #1 and #2 are actually the same thing.</p>
> >     </item>
> >     <item>Then there is thing3.</item>
> >   </list>
> >
> 
> when we use such a trick to model a list that all of its items are at the
> same level, it's misleading. In our case, we have 10 items (for example)
> which each of them may have several paragraphs or even contain some
> lists. Beside the inner model of each item, we have some paragraphs after
> some of them explainig some features or such about some of previous
> items.
> 
> And about using the <floatingText> as Martin proposed:
> > the simplest solution is
> > 
> >  <div>
> > <head>Chapter 1</head>
> > <p>The grandfather told his grandchildren a story.</p>
> > <floatingText>
> > <body>
> > <p>A prince and a princess met.</p>
> > <p>And they lived happily ever after.</p>
> > </body>
> > 
> > </floatingText>
> > 
> > <p>The grandchildren had already fallen asleep.</p>
> > </div>
> 
> again I feel that the James' suggestion (using a <div> element) is
> better, because I think that we should use the <floatingText> element
> when we faced with a somewhat independent text division and when we faced
> with some type of interrupting within the main text, not in the cases
> where we have some paragraphs about some phenomena explained in previous
> divisions and in fact may be continuation of the leading paragraphs of
> the main division.
> 
> <div>
> <p> some text about the main subject of the division and we now start to
> dive into some details in separate sub-divisions:</p>
> <div>
> ...
> </div>
> <div>
> ...
> </div>
> <div>
> ...
> </div>
> <p> now I want to continue my explanation in the leading paragraph(s)
> noting pointing to some details in previous subdivisions and again diving
> into some other details in more divisions</p>
> <div>
> ...
> </div>
> ...
> 
> I think that such cases may be usual in scientific, linguistic or other
> books and puting the paragraphs between <div> elements into <div>,
> although seems the only way to do this, it's not the correct model in
> real cases, because we should model what may be depicted in the authors'
> mind in the best way. So, I think that in this case also the restriction
> made in the <div> element model may be reconsidered.
> 
> Best wishes, Saeed
-- 
Paul Schaffner  Digital Library Production Service
[log in to unmask] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/