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On Sat, 17 Oct 2015 14:17:49 -0400, J S Jones <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On Fri, 16 Oct 2015 17:44:54 -0600, Logan Kearsley <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>>>Also, I'm a little unclear on how you figure out which arguments are
>>>>which when there's a mixture of full phrases and index clitics.
>>>
>>> Where there are 2 arguments, the full phrase matches the non-indexed argument, if that's your question. I would think that the instances where all arguments are phrases would be more difficult. Or is your question about how to know the argument structure of a given predicate? In
>>>
>>> child=Def=3C pie=Ind eat-Prf=Tmp fork=Def 3C-wash=Fin
>>>
>>> the main predicate "wash" has a prefixed agent (3C) and a suffixed patient (0).
>>
>>I kinda figured if all the arguments are phrases, then they just go in
>>X-Y-Z order.
>
>It's actually Y Z X, as specified in the Basic Morphosyntax chapter (which needs a lot of work).
>
>>In this case, I'm guessing the 0-patient suffix counts as the
>>"non-indexed" argument? If so, then I can see how that sentence works,
>>but how do you, for example distinguish between an indexed Y with a 0
>>Z prefix, vs. a 0 Y and indexed Z? Is that just handled by what
>>semantically "makes sense"?
>>
>>-l.
>
>At present, Z- is limited to the localizers and can't be indexed. However, there are (of course) reasons to change this. I may have to introduce animacy/gender distinctions as used in many of my sketches; Z would be inanimate only and Y would be animate only (for trivalents). But that would complicate the whole grammar.
>
>Jeff

I checked and the gender distinction isn't feasible. However, there are quasi-pronouns that are used for Z consisting of index values prefixed to an identity predicate (or copula) plus a definite determiner. So for a relationship transfer clause, a single index prefix is Y-0-, not 0-Z-. I probably need to change the documentation to clarify that.

... 4co$ 5th.I3.f "He gave it to her." assuming 3 = he, 4 = it (e.g. a cat), and 5 = her.

Jeff