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On 14/11/2015 15:25, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:
> Hallo conlangers!
>
> On 14.11.2015 11:52, BPJ wrote:
>
>> Just to be clear: Jeff's post is a clear example of
>> the kind of discussion of 'auxy' languages which is
>> ok. Not advocacy but grammar design. Moreover he
>> states that it's a fictional auxlamg in an imaginary
>> world. Thus a very regular artlang. Nothing wrong with
>> them. I'm constantly struggling to make my artlangs
>> more irregular. It ain't easy!
>
> Amen!

Amen from me also!

> Jeff's post is nothing that asks for being relegated to
> AUXLANG. First, it is a *design* issue, which would be
> legitimate here even if it was a serious IAL proposal,
> and not auxlang advocacy or politics;

Yep.

> second, it is a *fictional* auxlang and thus an
> *artlang*, which means that its place is here and not on
> AUXLANG,

Yes, just like Outidic   :)

In fact, TAKE began, if you recall, also as a fictional
auxlang in an alternate time-line. There were quite a few
emails about TAKE, but _no one_ suggested taking it to
AUXLANG - not even to AUXLANG in an alternate time-line :D

But Outidic is supposed to have been composed in 17th 
century Britain in our own time-line.  No one, however, 
suggested taking the discussion to AUXLANG.

But Jeff's auxlang was not only fictional but unlike Outidic
and (in its original form) TAKE, it is set in a "currently
unknown world"!

> where many people probably think that artlangs, even
> fictional auxlangs, are unwelcome.

Indeed - and they would all be baffled by ...

[snip]
>
> What Jeff posted is indeed interesting.  It is
> essentially a multiple verb voice system similar to
> those found in some Austronesian languages - an active,
> a passive and a truckload of applicatives.

... a verbal system with "an active, passive and a truckload
of applicatives."     ;)

I agree - Jeff's post is interesting. I must dig out my
notes on Tagalog  :)

-- 
Ray
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http://www.carolandray.plus.com
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"Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigenen Kosten denkt,
wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
[J.G. Hamann, 1760]
"A mind that thinks at its own expense
will always interfere with language".