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... ok then.  I'll just be going back to lurk mode over here...

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 2:32 PM, R A Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 18/11/2015 18:17, And Rosta wrote:
>
>> On 18 Nov 2015 13:46, "J. 'Mach' Wust" wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, 15 Nov 2015 18:02:52 -0500, Mark J. Reed
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> I think this is a nice layman's introduction to the
>>>> English language's checkered past:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>> https://aeon.co/essays/why-is-english-so-weirdly-different-from-other-languages
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I don’t like it. It seems to me he is also “merely
>>> following in a long tradition of sunny, muscular
>>> boasts”.
>>>
>>
>> That was my feeling too. The one thing that piqued my
>> interest is the claim that English is highly unusual in
>> not having a sister language it's mutually
>> semi-intelligible with, so that the monoglot anglophone
>> experiences a far greater sense of isolation and
>> exclusion from the realm of other languages. But how
>> unusual is English in that regard? Hungarian, Japanese,
>> Greek, Albanian (unless Gheg and Tosk are only mutually
>> semi-intelligible?), Basque -- and surely there are many
>> others equally isolated.
>>
>
> Yep - and all except Japanese are *European* languages - the
> author seems to concentrate on Europe.  So English not quite
> so highly unusual in this respect even within Europe.
>
> Outside of Europe, besides Japanese in Asia there's Ainu,
> Burushaski, Korean and several others, in Africa at least
> Bangime, Hadza and Sandawe and probably several others; in
> New Guinea alone there are many, as there are in north and
> south America.
>
> OK in some places people have not been content to remain
> monoglot.  But in many cases it is bilingualism in two such
> languages, e.g. Ainu and Japanese    ;)
>
> Also, unlike most (all?) the above examples, English is not
> exactly a "language isolate"!  Even a monoglot anglophone in
> France, e.g. will see many familiar words   ;)
>
>
> --
> Ray
> ==================================
> http://www.carolandray.plus.com
> ==================================
> "Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigenen Kosten denkt,
> wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
> [J.G. Hamann, 1760]
> "A mind that thinks at its own expense
> will always interfere with language".
>



-- 
Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>