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Ngade n Tim Ar hoï "sing" < Proto-Tim Ar-O bowi

> On Jan 11, 2016, at 18:21, Padraic Brown <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> This is highly unusual of me, but in order to honour the legendary artist we just lost, I decided to create a 
>> word in Haotyétpi based on his name. That word is:
>> 
>> _powí_ [po̞ˈʋiˑ], transitive verb: "to sing, to chant, to tell (a myth or tale), to worship (a god or spirit)"
>> 
>> Bowie's talent could never be summed up in a noun, so I made it a verb.
>> 
>> -- 
>> Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
> 
> I don't think I've ever heard any of his music (none of the albums or song titles sound familiar, anyway), but I did find it interesting how he seems to have reinvented himself over and over again throughout his career. Not my style, but pretty cool that he was able to pull that trick off for something like forty or fifty years.
> 
> So, opening up our Berlitz Talarian-English/English-Talarian dictionary, we find:
> 
> powem. [Ylm. bowa-] start over, break something down and begin afresh
> 
> Like H., T. lacks voiced stops. While powem and powí certainly don't share semantic space, I don't find the concatenation of singing, telling myths and worshipping to be at all strange. There is a natural bond between these three actions. I would say that the Christian liturgy is a great act of powí!
> 
> In Avantimannish, there is cânen, which can mean to enchant a work of magic (to sing a spell); to intone or chant. This verb, in its second definition, is used exclusively in a religious, mythic, deep sawyery or liturgical sense. It is found on the lips of epic poets and gospel writers alike, and probably would be a good translation of powí.
> 
> Daine don't worship (or even have the concept of) gods the way Men do, but they too have a similar word: shinanntannein, which means to craft an enchantment, tell a story, teach lore (particularly of a mythical kind), tell the tribal history. Certainly the tales and songs concerning the great Powers (those beings closest to the Creator and who gave all creation its shape) would come under this verb very nicely. They also have harachanwin to wrap or enshroud, to ensorcel through story.