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I agree. The idea that there is an ur-language that is the equivalent of machine code for the brain, that bypasses all the higher levels and gives you direct access to the lowest controls, is a fascinating conceit, but it has almost nothing to do with Sapir-Whorf.  Even if we accept that spoken language is the programming language of the brain, the differences between most languages are inconsequential in terms of what they let you do - much as all Turing-complete programming languages have the same power. They differ in ease of expression, naturally favor different metaphors, and so on, but don't fundamentally restrict what you can do.

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> On Feb 2, 2016, at 06:47, Juanma Barranquero <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> I translated it to Spanish.
> 
> But I don't think the book is really about the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. It's
> more directly inspired by "The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of
> the Bicameral Mind", by Julian Jaynes.
> ‚Äč
>    Juanma