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That's only "if" for reported yes-no questions, I.e. for the "if" that can
be replaced by "whether". You shouldn't confuse that "if" with the
conditional "if". Just because they are the same in English doesn't mean
they need to be in other languages.

Same with "when" used for time questions and for time subclauses. In
English they are the same word, but they don't need to be. And indeed,
German makes the distinction with "wenn" vs. "wann" (and Dutch with "als"
vs. "wanneer").

The important thing is what I said in my second paragraph: in Dutch and
German, time and conditional subclauses are expressed with the same
conjunction.

By the way, I take it you meant to send this to the list and not to me
alone.
--
Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
President of the Language Creation Society (http://conlang.org)

Personal Website: http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com
Personal Tumblr:  http://christophoronomicon.tumblr.com

Sent from my phone. Sorry for the potential typos and autocorrect errors.
On 13 May 2016 9:31 p.m., "Scott Hlad" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> What about "ob"'in German?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 13, 2016, at 12:52 PM, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> On 13 May 2016 8:34 p.m., "Scott Villanueva-Hlad" <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> > Hello Everyone,
> >
> > My husband's L1 is Tagalog and L2 is English. Quite often he substitutes
> the word "if" with the word "when". The an example of could be when he is
> waiting for me to pick him. He tells me to text him "if" I am leaving. We
> would say to text "when" I am leaving. In this context "If" implies that I
> may or may not be leaving. "When" implies that I will be leaving but the
> time of my departure is not yet established. I'm not sure whether Tagalog
> makes a distinction here but I have found it interesting enough to ponder
> over. Are there natlangs out there that do not make a distinction in this
> area?
> >
>
> There are, and you don't even have to leave the Germanic family to find
> them: both in German and in Dutch, "if" and "when" are one word: "wenn" in
> German and "als" in Dutch.
>
> Basically, time subclauses and conditional subclauses use the same
> conjunction in these two languages. In my experience it never leads to
> misunderstandings.
> --
> Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
> President of the Language Creation Society (http://conlang.org)
>
> Personal Website: http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com
> Personal Tumblr:  http://christophoronomicon.tumblr.com
>
> Sent from my phone. Sorry for the potential typos and autocorrect errors.
>
>