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> But the blocks of conlangs are not made of plastic, they are written strings of fonts, and now sounds in movie tracks it seems.

Not fonts (the software bundle); typefaces (the grapheme forms). Fonts
can be copyrighted (ish); typefaces can't be.

Citation: see our amicus brief & Dentons legal memorandum, both
available @ http://conlang.org/axanar

> So I'm still interested whether a text, audio or video file meant for the public and featuring conlang materials could be considered as a questionable copy of original works over there.

I don't understand your question.

A specific recording (text, audio, or video) describing a conlanging
can certainly be copyrighted. That doesn't grant any right to the
thing being described, though, nor any monopoly on describing it.

- Sai

On Sun, May 8, 2016 at 10:42 PM, David Quatremartin
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> John Q wrote:
>
>>The analogy that occurs to me is that the conlanger is like someone how has invented, say, Lego blocks and demonstrates to the world how >you can build a simulacrum of a house with them.  There's no stopping anyone else from now using those Lego blocks to build a simulacrum of >a tree, a duck, a space-ship, or using them to make an abstract sculpture, making a pair of pants out of them, or even putting the Lego blocks >into a pie and baking it in the oven.>
>
> Hopefully Lego may only stop the blockmakers and not the block users.
> But the blocks of conlangs are not made of plastic, they are written strings of fonts, and now sounds in movie tracks it seems.
> There are plenty of links to click on along this thread, but as we say on this tiny strip of the side of the Pond: "Accumulation n'est pas raison".
>
> So I'm still interested whether a text, audio or video file meant for the public and featuring conlang materials could be considered as a questionable copy of original works over there.
> Even if each block could not be considered a piece of original works in itself, maybe their accumulation in the file could be considered as the copy of an extensive part of original works like of a novel, movie, grammar, dictionary, you name it, beyond the obvious need of quoting or discussing them?
> Would then the fact that the accumulated blocks probably never appear in the file in the same order as in the original works dismiss the case?
> Etc. quite apart from the fact that conlangers are already free to relinquish their possible rights under CCs or else.
>
> On a completely different topic, the cold-blooded way you managed to close your Russian adventure is extremely impressive.
>
> DQ