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On 2016-11-04, Leo Moser wrote:

> The point being made here is, I believe, that there is evidence that cross
> cultural variables are in fact being ironed out, and similar interpretations
> assigned to emojis. A conventional order for stringing emoji into sentences
> seems emerging as well.
>
> That would constitute a sort of spontaneous language creation, for the
> string of emojis could then be converted to speech and/or related graphemes.
>
> Each emoji could be linked to an Esperanto or Ido word for example. The
> order of stringing would create an isolating grammar.

Of course, there has always been the question whether an oligosynthetic 
language is "up to the task" of being sufficient for enough of all 
communication. As interested as I have been in the past in, for example, 
Searight's Sona (and I have a lot of material, including "The Book," in 
my own web pages), I am skeptical whether it (or any other o-s language) 
is up to the task for, let us say, a complex international diplomatic 
treaty. Esperanto or Interlingua just might, in a pinch, but I doubt a 
text in emojis could do it. (How do emojis deal with proper nouns, for 
example, or "enriched uranium"?) For simple things, perhaps, but I doubt 
it in the long run.

-- 
Paul Bartlett