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On 14 November 2016 at 15:11, The Scribbler <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Ah. I had a feeling this allophone had turned into something else
> altogether. I didn't know it was no longer aspirated when it went
> fricative. Thank you.
>
> I shall try the inhalation trick, though I admit it's really difficult
> with this one because it's technically made by exhaling through the word.
> How do?
>

Do it with egressive (pulmonic) airstream, and then, keeping the position
of the supraglottal articulators unchanged, switch to ingressive (pulmonic)
airstream.


> Considering the airflow over the sides of the tongue, I think a lateral
> fricative of some kind should be a valid analysis. Though I do wonder,
> should I just ignore the sibilant aspect in trying to notate it? Because
> when I read through the lateral fricatives this morning, there didn't seem
> any acknowledgement of that possibility.
>

My phonetic knowledge might be coming up a bit short here. AIUI, phonetic
sibilance is the acoustic effect of the extreme turbulence of the airstream
that results from it being jetted against the teeth. In that case, anything
that can squirt air against the teeth, which should include lateral
fricatives, should count as sibilants. But I stand to be corrected.

--And.



>
> Thank you again!
>
>
>       From: And Rosta <[log in to unmask]>
>  To: [log in to unmask]
>  Sent: Monday, November 14, 2016 7:14 AM
>  Subject: Re: What do you call this phoneme?
>
> On 14 November 2016 at 11:53, The Scribbler <0000010ecc18bfa1-dmarc-
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > I'll check out the palatals. But no, it's not a plosive. In speaking
> > terms, it's an aspirated h with increased frication due to the narrowing
> of
> > the channel. All the instances of h have that poof of air bounced off an
> > articulator.
>
>
> So in phonetic terms we would call it a fricative rather than aspirated or
> an instance of h. It occurs to me it might also be a lateral fricative,
> perhaps a palatal lateral fricative. Do you know the trick of inhaling
> while (voicelessly) making the sound? The inflowing air cools the gums and
> tongue at the point of entry, which helps you identify the point of entry.
> (Be careful if you are not young, & have teeth sensitive to cold.)
>
> --And.
>
>
>
>
>