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I should perhaps have added an option: occasionally I have
'demoted' my paragraphs to <ab>s in circumstances like this,
precisely in order to take advantage of their @type and @subtype
attributes. pfs

On Wed, Apr 12, 2017, at 15:34, Paul Schaffner wrote:
> For a while I toyed with adding an attribute to a number of
> elements that were found to be acting in this way: elements
> that recurred, and behaved similarly, but were distinguished
> by some functional feature. Short of using feature structures,
> or abusing one of the rendition attributes, there didn't seem a
> ready way to do this. (I think I tested out @role for this purpose.)
> 
> Martin's example seems to be of just this sort. Other examples
> (not always involving <p>) might be:
> 
> 1. lines of a hymn. Some lines are required (invariable); others
> may optionally be skipped and are marked as such, e.g. by being
> printed in smaller type.  LLllLlLL.
> 
> 2. speeches or parts of speeches. Some plays present a full
> reading text of a play but mark some speeches (or lines, etc.)
> as bits to be skipped during actual performance. (Come to think
> of it, the Congressional Record would do well to do likewise:)
> 
> 3. marking source of a text. Some books distinguish the source
> or authoritativeness of parts of its running text by typographic
> means, e.g., the fourth edition might print everything new to
> this edition in one font, but print everything carried over from
> a previous edition in another font, so if you just want to read
> the earlier text, stick to the text in the appropriate font. Similarly
> with text rebutting an opponent: some paragraphs marked as
> points on which the author agrees with the opponent, others
> as divergent. &c &c
> 
> 4. marking function within an argument. E.g. alternating paragraphs
> representing opposing points of view (point / counterpoint); or
> question and response; or doctrine and elaboration; or statement
> and defense of same.
> 
> I'm still not sure that @type is quite right for this (since it feels
> as though p @type should distinguish types of paragraphs, not types of
> content), but I think I agree that the use case is real, and is perhaps
> quite widely distributed.
> 
> pfs
> 
> On Wed, Apr 12, 2017, at 14:33, Martin Mueller wrote:
> > I don’t think so. I think of <argument>  as a summary of what follows. A
> > Gnomon article might have the following sequence of paragraphs, where
> > upper and lower case distinguish the different types:
> > 
> > PPPpPppPPp etc
> > 
> > I’m sure I’ve seen this elsewhere. The author sends the signal: “you can
> > skip this paragraph, but it’s part of a continuous argument.” You could
> > of course encode it, using @rend or @rendition. But a @type attribute
> > might be a better way of articulating this discursive structure, and you
> > could derive particular layout instructions from the structural encoding. 
> > 
> > On 4/12/17, 12:07 PM, "TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) public discussion
> > list on behalf of Martin Holmes" <[log in to unmask] on behalf of
> > [log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > 
> >     This rather sounds like it might be a job for <argument>:
> >     
> >     <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.tei-2Dc.org_release_doc_tei-2Dp5-2Ddoc_en_html_ref-2Dargument.html&d=DwICaQ&c=yHlS04HhBraes5BQ9ueu5zKhE7rtNXt_d012z2PA6ws&r=rG8zxOdssqSzDRz4x1GLlmLOW60xyVXydxwnJZpkxbk&m=FXRw3zJHKvtQOXEKltpN_laj_RInMXBzcdv1PnglcCY&s=ArhMNH3Tk8ixBDtg8zBAzuPqb6vdxFjXXWPsylhv0BU&e=
> >     >
> >     
> >     Cheers,
> >     Martin
> >     
> >     On 2017-04-12 11:04 AM, Martin Mueller wrote:
> >     > I just stumbled an earlier thread about a @type attribute for <p> , and
> >     > there was a question about use cases. Here is one I can think of right
> >     > away. In the days long ago, when I regularly thumbed the Classics review
> >     > journal Gnomon, I always appreciated reviews that had a main argument in
> >     > larger type and subsidiary stuff in smaller type.  So you could read the
> >     > whole thing or skip the fine print. You could  model the fine print
> >     > stuff as inline notes, but I think of notes as bits of text that sit
> >     > explicitly outside the text stream, while the alternation of paragraphs
> >     > in Gnomon stays within a sequential reading order.
> >     >
> >     >
> >     >
> >     
> > 
> -- 
> Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> University of Michigan Libraries
> [log in to unmask] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
-- 
Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
University of Michigan Libraries
[log in to unmask] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/