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> On Apr 12, 2017, at 12:04 PM, Martin Mueller <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> I just stumbled an earlier thread about a @type attribute for <p> , and there was a question about use cases. Here is one I can think of right away. In the days long ago, when I regularly thumbed the Classics review journal Gnomon, I always appreciated reviews that had a main argument in larger type and subsidiary stuff in smaller type.  So you could read the whole thing or skip the fine print. You could  model the fine print stuff as inline notes, but I think of notes as bits of text that sit explicitly outside the text stream, while the alternation of paragraphs in Gnomon stays within a sequential reading order.
>  

Tw similar examples from the 20th century:  when the programming language REXX was introduced for IBM mainframes, at least one of the manuals (probably the User’s Guide) explicitly marked two reading paths, one for the first reading covering key concepts and avoiding some details, the other (a superset of the first, if I remember correctly) including discussions of details and less crucial topics.  I no longer recall how the two were distinguished (arrows and instructions to skip to section n.m? or type size? or …?).

And the TeX and LaTeX books explicitly mark some material with a ‘dangerous curve’ icon to signal that it may safely be skipped for introductory purposes.

Like Martin (Holmes), I see that this could be captured with divs and a strong stomach for a very broad interpretation of div.  Like Martin (Mueller), I think I’d rather use an attribute on p (or two distinctive element types); it doesn’t feel at all div-like to me.

My instinct would be to say this is a good example of why it’s important that conforming uses of TEI be allowed to add attributes and elements to the vocabulary, but I have the impression that not everyone agrees that extending the Guidelines should be a normal and accepted part of using TEI.  (TEI P3 was itself a conforming instance of TEI P3, which extended and modified the vocabulary slightly as a way of underscoring the point that extensions and modifications are not shameful or undesirable.  At least, that was what at least one of the editors thought and said.)

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C. M. Sperberg-McQueen
Black Mesa Technologies LLC
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