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On 21 April 2017 at 12:04, Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Y'all know there's a daily limit on posts to the list, right? But if you
> want to spend yours profligately posting pointless pedantry, please
> proceed! :)
>
> The first conlang I ever created that wasn't just an English relex had a
> case for each of the traditional journalist questions; who, what, why,
> where, and when - of course, there are different ways to map those
> depending on the form the rest of the question takes, but I took them as
> respectively nominative, accusative, dative, locative, and temporal.  When
> that felt incomplete, I next added "whence" and "whither" as well - which
> of course are the ablative and allative being discussed in this thread.
> But that felt overbalanced in favor of space over time, so I added temporal
> analogs, answering "since when" and "until when". But I never came up with
> good names for those.  I wound up calling them "spatial
> locative/ablative/allative" and "temporal locative/ablative/allative",
> which wasn't very satisfactory.
>
> I wound up conflating the spatial and temporal senses, so they used the
> same case for both "where" and "when", attributing it to concultural
> awareness of the fundamental equivalence of space and time. Which didn't
> really make sense for a human culture, even an interstellarly transplanted
> one, but oh well.

Interesting! I did much the same thing with Celimine, which I also
consider to be my first "real" conlang.
While I've often contemplated how that linguistic quirk might
contribute to a greater capacity to understand the concept of
spacetime, however, the concultural explanation for it was (and is)
just that, if you want to meet somebody, you have to know both where
and when to show up- so there's one question word that means *both*,
demonstratives that answer both, and grammaticalization so that every
sentence must address both.

-l.