Print

Print


​ As for the name of the Martian Language, so far I know of a couple of
terms: Hlávë, which is really just a generic word for "language," Mallávë,
which would mean something like "The Kingly Language."  No doubt other
terms I shall discover as I look at other sources (next month I shall be
examining Tolstoy's "Aelita of Mars.")

 Now, as for what to call the language in English, be it "Martian Latin,"
or "Martian Quenya," or "Martian Esperanto," or "Classical Martian," I'll
let the List debate that.

 It seems clear to me that Lewis had 1930s-ish Qenya in mind when he wrote
"Eldil" and "Hlab" and "Oyarsa," though he also seems to have had in mind
infixes and some rather complex ablaut which give his words their own
texture.
 In terms of how Wells' Mars, and Tolstoy's Mars, and Greg's Mars, and the
Marses of Lewis and Burroughs and Bradbury and others can all be the same
place, this is an exercise in which fans have spent countless hours to make
all of these Mars the same landscape ... um, Marscape.

 Den Valdron on the erbzine list has written many articles on the subject,
which can be found here:

http://www.erbzine.com/mag14/1402.html

 (He mentions me in the article about Aelita that I pestered him to write).

 I'm trying to use as much of Greg's "Martial Language," as I can.  Most of
his affixes and vocabulary present no problems.  Some of his inflexions
I've been able to take.  Fortunately he provides the verb "To Be" (avi),
which is quite useful - I used it in one of the sample sentences I quoted
yesterday.
 Very little of Paul Frommer's material I've been able to find.  His
Martian is a staccato Indonesian-inspired language.  I did borrow and
modify a couple of his ideas: gi, gig "they, them" becomes ngí (they,
absolutive case), for instance.

 My Martian can't quite be of the staccato flavor, though.  This is the
Martian, after all, of the mask-clad, bee-gun-weilding Martians of Ray
Bradbury who sail upon sand skiffs.  The Martian of Dejah Thoris (Nheshah
Thóris) and Thuvia of Ptarth (Thuvïa Ptartho), and the poetry of Hyoi (um
... Hyoi) has a certain sound in my mind.

 It occurred to me that, just using the words of Martian Quenya (Martian
Latin?) I've been able to glean from the pulpy sources, I have all of the
words, save two, needed to translate the western version of the Ave Maria.
The two words missing are "pray" and "sinner."

 Perhaps Martian Esperanto (Martian Volapük?)  has no distinct word for
"pray."  If memory serves, I believe that's the case with gzb.  More
likely, though, "pray" is derived from "say," perhaps "lordly-say."  As for
"sinner," it'll no doubt come from the root meaning "bent."

 Since Martian Láadan (Martian Loglan?)  is structurally similar to Elvish
Quenya (Quenya Quenya?) , I'll compare Tolkien's version of the Hail Mary
with my attempt below.  Note that Tolkien just uses the forms "María" and
"Yésus," which, for the purposes of this exercise I'll follow.  Also, the
Quenya reads "at the hour when we die" rather than "the hour of our death."

 (For an in-depth analysis of Tolkien's Hail Mary translation, see H. K.
Fauskanger's treatise at: http://folk.uib.no/hnoht/)


 AIA MARÍA QUANTA ERUANNO I HÉRU AS ALYË
 Alú hil María' o vulpë' Ellolet, Maleldiler nototlë.
 Ah!  Oh Mary who full grace-with Lord-erg with-thee.
 "Oh Mary, full of grace, Maleldil is with thee."

 AISTANA ELYË IMÍCA NÍSI, AR AISTANA I YÁVA MÓNALYO YÉSUS.
 Malacar thá thelcin shashaishshë, shun malacar o sopu' átahotlo Yésus.
 Blessed-erg thou among women-distrib-loc and blessed-erg the fruit
egg-thy-gen Jesus.
 "Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thine egg,
Jesus."

 AIRË MARÍA ERUO ONTARIL Á HYAMË RÁMEN ÚCARINDOR SÍ AR LÚMESSË YA
FIRUVAMMË.  NÁSIË.
 Hil ofarëa María' o' Ótho Thuwa ?? feundoi mi ?? yel në shodnol rhovofto.
Ar!
 Oh holy Mary who God-gen mother PRAY-continuous them-I-dat who-distrib
SINNER-distrib now and hour-acc death-they-I-gen.  So-be-it!
 "Holy Mary, God's Mother, (pray) for us (sinners) now and at the hour of
our death.  So be it!"

 Until next time, Jasoomians.