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Here are the rules for my  (in-universe conlang) anarcho-syndicalist language with Lakes Plain phonology and root and template morphology.   I imagine that the world in which this is spoken has a sort of reverse/sideways fundamentalist ideology that believes strongly to the point of being an unexamined premise  that each ideology can only be expressed in a language specifically designed for it.  So  lots of new languages,  in all of whom translation from it and translation into it is fundamentally impossible  and almost certainly a cause of offense because of the ideological differences! I have cycled through several possibilities, but this seems to be the most stable phonemic set of rules.  Comments  nonetheless welcome.

UnVoiced consonants (P, T, K)
1. Voiceless Consonants become plosives (p, t,k)
a.  If the radical is geminate
b.  As the onset of a non-initial syllable
c.  As the coda of a final syllable
2.  Voiceless consonants become fricatives (f,s, h < x)
 a. As the onset of the initial syllable
b. As the coda of a syllable if the onset of the next syllable  is a voiceless plosive.
3.  Voiceless consonants  become voiced fricatives (v,z, y < ɣ)
a. As the coda of a syllable if the onset of the next syllable is voiced.

 Voiced consonants (B, D)
 1. Voiced consonants  become plosives (b, d)
a.  If the radical is geminate
b.  As the onset of a non-initial syllable 
c.  As the coda of a final syllable
2.  Voiced consonants become 'liquids' (w,r)
 a.  As the onset of an initial syllable
b. As the coda of a syllable no matter what the voicing of the onset of the next syllable
BUT
3. Voiced consonants become nasals (m,n)
a. If the voiced consonant  is the onset or coda of a syllable containing /a/ [ã]
b.  If the voiced consonant is a geminate radical  where either the onset or the coda or both adjacent to the radical contains /a/

The craziest idea which I rejected was a devoicing of the Voiced plosives  in word final position  so that a final voiceless plosive reflected a voiced plosive in the root and pattern  morphology but a voiceless plosive elsewhere. Final voiceless plosives in this scheme became voiceless fricatives, so no confusion in the final position, but potentially too confusing to even native speakers.