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OK. Why "avoid masculine sex appeal on female"?
Is this like hijab and burqa  to control the the behavior of men 'caused'
by the physicality of women?
Would Laadan speaking men be swarmed by women if they uttered 'forbidden'
sounds?
Deus benedicat tibi in omnibus semper,
Paul

On Sat, May 27, 2017 at 2:17 AM, Seth KAZAN <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> The lack of some consonants in Laadan can be seen as an effort of
> efficiency to reduce the effort of clarity or to avoid masculine sex
> appeal on female...
> But that not explain the coincidence...
>
> 2017-05-26 22:20 UTC+02:00, Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
> <[log in to unmask]>:
> > Your coincidence and your references are very interesting, Seth. The note
> > in the first reference about the difference between male speakers  of
> > English and French might help explain why some English speakers view
> French
> > as a more effeminate language.
> > How else could this be explicitly used in creating a conlang as you did
> > with tuskheejlusav?
> > Dieu vous bénit toujours, toutes façons,
> > Paul
> >
> > On Fri, May 26, 2017 at 9:08 AM, Seth KAZAN <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> >> I found this for a  begining of answer...
> >> https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00764811/document
> >> http://www.newswise.com/articles/voice-appeal
> >>
> >> 2017-05-17 21:04 GMT+02:00 Seth KAZAN <[log in to unmask]>:
> >> > Another thing, the phonology of the làadan which is built for a
> >> > predominantly feminine use, bizarrely has a lack of certain consonants
> >> ...
> >> > What intrigues me is that, without knowing it, I partly reproduce this
> >> > bizarre when I distinguished a feminine and masculine pronunciation in
> >> > tuskheejlusav ...
> >> > Yet I do not have the same mother tongue as S H Elgin...
> >> > And I have not found any other linguistic or psychological explanation
> >> that
> >> > explains this coincidence...
> >> > Do you have an opinion above that...
> >> >
> >> > 2017-05-17 19:25 GMT+02:00 Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
> >> > <[log in to unmask]>:
> >> >>
> >> >> Occupation may have more to do with color discrimination than
> culture.
> >> As
> >> >> an artist, I am aware of and can name more color differences than
> most
> >> >> people. But can women artists do better than me?
> >> >> Culture, in the fine grained sense, may be a cause of the gender
> >> >> difference. Cultural differences between men and women are like
> >> dialectal
> >> >> differences in language. What is it about the life of women and girls
> >> that
> >> >> gives them reason, like artists, to discriminate and name more
> colors?
> >> >> Que Deus te abençoe sempre, e de todas as maneiras,
> >> >> Paul
> >> >>
> >> >> On Wed, May 17, 2017 at 8:15 AM, Jyri Lehtinen
> >> >> <[log in to unmask]
> >> >
> >> >> wrote:
> >> >>
> >> >> > How well do these studies differentiate actual perception of colour
> >> from
> >> >> > cultural factors? There isn't necessarily a one-to-one
> >> >> > correspondence
> >> >> > between different degrees of perceiving colour differences and how
> >> fine
> >> >> > grained colour terminology you bother using in your everyday life.
> >> >> > As
> >> an
> >> >> > example, when I look out from my window, I can see a bunch of
> >> different
> >> >> > colours but at the same time I'm happiest to simply call most of
> >> >> > them
> >> >> > "green".
> >> >> >
> >> >> >    -Jyri
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >> > 2017-05-17 13:44 GMT+02:00 Juliano Cruz Gusmão
> >> >> > <[log in to unmask]>:
> >> >> >
> >> >> > > It is already confirmed that women are better in differentiating
> >> >> > > colors
> >> >> > and
> >> >> > > man, shapes. This result came from scientific researchs.
> >> >> > > I think this can endorse those results.
> >> >> > > And yes, I think the description might give a clue of the gender
> >> >> > > of
> >> >> > > the
> >> >> > > speaker. Althought not 100% certain, I'm a man but work with
> >> drawing,
> >> >> > > painting and desing, therefore, I percieve colors better than men
> >> who
> >> >> > don't
> >> >> > > work in thes fields, as long as a woman architect would describe
> >> well
> >> >> > > shapes and forms.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > Happy to contribut,
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > Juliano.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > Juliano Cruz Gusmão.
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > E-mail: [log in to unmask]
> >> >> > > Facebook: Juliano Cruz Gusmão
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > "O pássaro de Minerva só alça seu vôo ao cair da noite."
> >> >> > > "La birdo de Minerva nur ekflugas cxe la nokta ekapero."
> >> >> > >      Hegel
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > "Sem um desvio do normal, o progresso é impossível."
> >> >> > > "Sen devio de la normaleco, la progresso neeblas."
> >> >> > >      Frank Zappa
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > "Os cegos fazem de tudo para ver a luz, os tolos, para não vê-la"
> >> >> > > "La blinduloj faros cxion por vidi la lumon, la stultoj, por ne
> >> >> > > gxin
> >> >> > vidi."
> >> >> > >      A. H. fuerstenthal
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > 2017-05-11 16:28 GMT-03:00 Paul Schleitwiler, FCM <
> >> >> > > [log in to unmask]>:
> >> >> > >
> >> >> > > > One granddaughter sent me a pdf of the research study she did
> >> >> > > > for
> >> a
> >> >> > > college
> >> >> > > > class about gender differences in the use of language to
> >> >> > > > describe
> >> >> > colors.
> >> >> > > > The result was interesting.
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > "... this study did in fact conclude that there is a difference
> >> that
> >> >> > > > is
> >> >> > > > evident between
> >> >> > > > the semantics and pragmatics of genders that does not appear to
> >> >> > > > be
> >> >> > > affected
> >> >> > > > by nationality, age, the amount of schooling, or any other
> >> >> > > > number
> >> of
> >> >> > > > socioeconomic factors, including their workplace. Wolfram and
> >> Estes
> >> >> > > states,
> >> >> > > > “in every language, there are a variety of ways to convey the
> >> >> > > > same
> >> >> > > > information or accomplish the same purpose, and the choice is
> of
> >> how
> >> >> > > > to
> >> >> > > say
> >> >> > > > something depends upon who is talking to whom under what
> >> >> > > > circumstances”
> >> >> > > > (Wolfram and Eses 86)."
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > Also, while women used more names for colors, their
> descriptions
> >> >> > > > were
> >> >> > > "more
> >> >> > > > specific, less certain, and less objective" than those of the
> >> >> > > > men.
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > While only a minor study by an undergraduate who isn't a
> >> linguistics
> >> >> > > major,
> >> >> > > > I thought to share this with you as seed for three or more
> >> >> > > > discussions,
> >> >> > > >     reactions to the study itself,
> >> >> > > >     implications for color language in conlangs,
> >> >> > > >     implications  for the concultures using conlangs ...
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > For example, can we tell from a written description of color
> >> whether
> >> >> > the
> >> >> > > > author was male or female? Why might a language develop certain
> >> ways
> >> >> > > > of
> >> >> > > > speaking about colors? Since some languages have different
> forms
> >> for
> >> >> > > > speakers who are male or female, or of different age or status
> >> >> > > > or
> >> >> > > affinity,
> >> >> > > > what might this study suggest about specific areas, like color,
> >> for
> >> >> > > > conlangs?
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > God bless you always, all ways,
> >> >> > > > Paul
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > > > I have finally discovered what’s wrong with my brain: On the
> >> >> > > > left
> >> >> > > > side,
> >> >> > > > there is nothing right, and on the right side, there is nothing
> >> >> > > > left.
> >> >> > > >
> >> >> > >
> >> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > odd-language.tumblr.com
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> odd-language.tumblr.com
> >>
> >
>
>
> --
> odd-language.tumblr.com
>