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> For example, given the main stream of your developments, to me
‹Imsningnor› screams out that it should be from ‹ImsVningnor› where V is
some lost high vowel.  Can you get away, for instance, with always deleting
the vowel of an open syllable second in a word of at least four syllables?
Yes, I think I can get away with that fairly easily.

> And regarding more vowel changes, I'd instead have said: I would see if I
could get the lax vs. tense contrast to be of (relatively) recent origin.
Did you try that?  How close to predictable is [±tense] in the list of
names you have?
The words contain several vowels where I didn't specify the tenseness. But
u and o seem to always be tense, as are any word-final vowels.

This gives me roughly the right consonants, I'll have to mess with the
vowels a bit more later.

1. p,b -> f,v after l or a stop, followed by a vowel, possibly with an
intervening p,b,l (tpa -> tfa, lppla -> lffla).
2. stops nasalize before nasal vowels (l does not block)
3. t and d become ɾ between vowels unless the vowels are
[eẽɛiĩɪuũʊ]__[iĩɪuũʊ]
4. g is deleted after ŋ
5. before velar stops m > n > ŋ
6. m,ŋ > n before alveolar stops
7. before labial stops ŋ > n > m > b
8. l > r between [eẽɛiĩɪuũʊ]__#
9. initial k > x
10. g > ɣ
11. t,d > ts,dz before high tense vowels
12. stops assimilate in voicing with preceding stops
13. initial x is deleted
14. final voiceless stops are deleted
15. final voiced stops are devoiced
16. ɾ is deleted before high vowels and becomes r elsewhere
17. ts > st and dz simplifies to z
18. l is deleted [eẽɛiĩɪuũʊ]__[fv]
19. t,d are deleted before l unless preceded by a vowel, in which case they
become s,z

Would it be reasonable for a vowel to be modified by a following l?

On Mon, May 22, 2017 at 2:47 AM, Alex Fink <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Sun, 21 May 2017 09:07:20 -0500, Daniel Swanson <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> >>>25. s is inserted between m and n
> >>
> >>Incomprehensible.  The phonetic transition between [m] and [n] is nothing
> >like [s].  At a pinch a change like this could be a hypercorrection
> against
> >[s] loss between [m] and [n], but you don't have [s] in that position.
> >On second thought, I'm really not sure why I thought that worked, but I do
> >know why it's there.
> >
> >I have a set of names from a story I wrote a while ago and I was trying to
> >make them fit. 25 was probably me giving up on finding a solution for
> ><Imsningnor>.
>
> Oh, I should have twigged that this was an internal reconstruction sort of
> thing!  That changes the way I should have turned my suggestions.
>
> For example, given the main stream of your developments, to me
> ‹Imsningnor› screams out that it should be from ‹ImsVningnor› where V is
> some lost high vowel.  Can you get away, for instance, with always deleting
> the vowel of an open syllable second in a word of at least four syllables?
>
> And regarding more vowel changes, I'd instead have said: I would see if I
> could get the lax vs. tense contrast to be of (relatively) recent origin.
> Did you try that?  How close to predictable is [±tense] in the list of
> names you have?
>
> Alex
>



-- 
Daniel Swanson, Certified Geek