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Not only is the stress different on those -ig words, but the real morphemes
in each case is the last THREE letters, not the last two: ear+wig,
peri+wig, whirly-gig, thing-ama-jig, Fizi-wig.

stevo

On Thu, Jun 15, 2017 at 4:19 PM, Alex Fink <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 18:17:44 +0000, Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> >All of the nonsense words in Jabberwocky have meanings that can be
> inferred
> >from context; that's sort of the point.
>
> Context guided by, and occasionally overruled by, authorial holy writ.
> For example:
>
> >Brillig is a time of day
>
> So indeed spake Humpty Dumpty: four in the afternoon, the time for
> broiling.  And my own Sprachgefühl does pick up on the root's affinity with
> "broil", though more so with "brilliant".  But there's no way that's the
> name of a time!  It's clearly an adjective, nicht wahr?  The Germanic
> adjective formant is the thing to leap to my mind, because stressless "-ig"
> isn't really something you get in English at all.  ("Earwig"?  "Periwig",
> "whirligig" "thingamajig" etc., our own Fiziwig?  all of those have at
> least some degree of secondary stress, I'd say.)  And an adjective, say
> meaning 'it was bright and boiling [in weather]', fits the parse just as
> well as a noun.
>
> Carroll wanted a time, he should have gone for "brilling".  Gerunds as
> time names there are plenty of: "morning", "evening", "gloaming", "dawing"
> (though that one's been reformed in mainstream English to "dawn").
>
> Alex
>