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<expan> should contain the whole of a word that has been expanded. 
<expan>Mister</expan> when the source says "Mr."

<ex> should contain the bits of an expansion which are not present in 
the source text but have been added to it by an editor.
M<ex>iste</ex>r.

The truly obsessive will also wish to mark (using <am>) the full stop 
which signals that "Mr." is an abbreviation of course.

<expan>M<ex>iste</ex>r</expan><am>.</am>

Of course, it might be that (this is for Bertrand) you think "Mr." is 
actually an abbreviation for "Monseigneur", in which case you'd have

<expan>M<ex>onseigneu</ex>r</expan><am>.</am>

Or, if unable to decide, a <choice> containing both, and maybe also an 
<abbr> holding the original form just for fun. Though in that case, 
where to put the <am> becomes a bit trickier.




On 19/07/17 17:42, MLH wrote:
> Could anyone explain the rationale for combining <ex> and <expan> in 
> this way? (for someone not as familiar with the transcription module 
> as he probably should be!)
> Thanks,
> Matthew
>