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This is another difference between en-UK and en-US. Confused the heck out
of me the first time I saw it. In English as spoken outside the UK, ‘after’
cannot be a conjunction.

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 09:01 Christa Hansberry <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Well, for what it's worth, I personally would not understand "I went to the
> chemist ... after ... I went to the post office", as anything other than "I
> went to the chemist after I went to the post office", in other words, "I
> went to the post office, and then went to the chemist". Maybe the usage is
> different in another region (I'm from the Pacific Northwest region of the
> US), but if I wanted to say I went to the chemist first, I would definitely
> say "afterwards" or "then", not "after" (I also suspect that "chemist" here
> refers to what I would call a pharmacist, but that's beside the point).
>
> -Christa
>
> On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 11:36 PM, stewart fraser <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > Does anybody here know Arabic. In Arabic, ba9d means “after” and ba9dain
> > means “afterwards” … I would like to know the etymology of the -“ain” in
> > ba9dain (I presume that if you go back far enough ba9d will mean
> “behind”).
> >
> > I find English to be a bit weird when it comes to “after” and
> > “afterwards”. Well after is a preposition … as in “after I went to the
> > chemist, I went to the post office”. But it can also be a conjunction …
> as
> > in “I went to the chemist … after … I went to the post office”
> >
> > Now it’s form as a conjunction can either be “afterwards” or “after that”
> > or just “after” with a small pause after it. It seems to me that “this
> > small pause” is acting as anaphora … it is referring back to “I went to
> the
> > chemist”.
> >
> > Note that is this small pause disappeard (or maybe I should say if the
> > intonation changed) you would have “I went to the chemist after I went to
> > the post office” which is the exact opposite to “I went to the chemist …
> > after … I went to the post office” (as many people use comma’s because
> they
> > look nice, rather than faithfully reflecting pauses (or potential pauses)
> > in speech … this must cause havoc with automatic translating programs)
> >
> > In my conlang I would like to make the anaphora element explicit rather
> > than relying on pauses.
> >
> > If English used the form “afterwards” as a conjunction exclusively I
> would
> > like it better (more logical). I read that -“wards” originally came from
> > *wer, P.I.E. for “to turn”. I don’t really see what lead to its
> > grammaticization thu’. Also I don’t really see what function it is
> > performing (or did perform at one time). Anybody got any ideas ?
> >
> >                                                        … Stewart Fraser
> >
>
-- 
Eyal Joseph Minsky-Fenick
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