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It's looking like the sequence is too exotic to be real, which is what I 
was a little afraid of.  Darn, my rules account for it perfectly, but I 
guess I'll just write up another rule that specifically blocks 
nasalization before a geminated nasal consonant.

Thanks for the responses.

On 7/19/2017 3:05 PM, Galen Buttitta wrote:
> I mean, *technically* Oneida and Mohawk/Kanien'kéha do, but nasalization isn't really contrastive on the vowels (I.e., the nasal vowels have no plain counterparts).
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 19, 2017, at 14:52, Tony Harris <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>
>> Abenaki, perhaps?  Or others in the Algonquin family?
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>> -------- Original message --------From: Doug Barton <[log in to unmask]> Date: 7/19/17  14:24  (GMT-05:00) To: [log in to unmask] Subject: [CONLANG] Nasal Vowels
>> Hello conlangers. Can anyone help me think of a (natural) language that
>> allows the sequence {nasal vowel + nasal consonant) in the same
>> syllable?  I'm looking for this in languages that contrast oral and
>> nasal vowels, not ones with oral vowels only but where vowels may be
>> nasalized to some degree just by proximity to a nasal consonant.
>>
>> Writing a little recap of vowel nasalization in Lusitanian (link below,
>> where "palatalized" with respect to vowels means "tense") got me
>> wondering what other languages use this sequence contrastively, but I
>> can't think of any.  Lusitanian has it when a vowel is followed by a
>> geminated nasal.
>>
>> https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0m_-64EIoH6QVFVMUQzN3BlV3c
>>
>> Thanks to whoever can enlighten me.
>> Doug
>