Print

Print


Also interesting: To me, ‘slaves were we’ = ‘we were slaves’, but ‘slaves
were us’ = ‘we were the slaves’.
The first seems to be in OVS order to me, while the second is SVO and
missing an article.
(Weird chain of thought led me here: _The Prisoner_ -> how do you translate
“I am not a number, I am a free man” into Hebrew -> ‎עבדים היינו‎ ->
‘slave-PL COP.PAST-1.PL’ -> ‘slaves were we’)

On Tue, Sep 5, 2017 at 10:29 AM, mughtej <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> In Japanese and Turkish, one way to distinguish them is like this.
>
> He is a doctor.
>
> 彼は医者です。
> Kare-ha isha-desu.
>
> O, doktordur.
>
> He is (a) doctor.
>
>
>
> He is the doctor:
>
> 医者は彼です。
>  Isha-ha kare-desu.
>
> Doktor, odur.
>
> (The) doctor is him.
>
> On 2017(09M7W03)246, at 13H39M40S, Raymond Brown <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> On 02/09/2017 19:38, J S Jones wrote:
> > On Sat, 2 Sep 2017 10:26:10 -0600, Logan Kearsley wrote:
> >> English typically relies on definiteness in a predicate nominal:
> >> "He is a doctor." (Proper Inclusion- he is a member of the
> >> category of "doctors".)
> >> "He is the doctor." (Equation- he and the doctor are the same person.)
> [snip]
> >> So, do you worry about distinguishing those cases, and if so, how do
> you do it?
>



-- 
Eyal Joseph Minsky-Fenick
[log in to unmask] (personal)
[log in to unmask] (school)
203-393-1394 (home)
203-988-2234 (cell)
9 Birch Rd., Woodbridge, CT 06525