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Apparently the word Klamath (the language name) comes from /tlamatl/, So
that would be another borowing of tl as kl, It seems that tl is very
definitely 'wrong' in English for some reason. No idea why though.

On Thu, Sep 7, 2017 at 11:32 AM, Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> And of course Dr. Okrand's version of Klingon has [tɬ] as the initial sound
> of their native word for themselves, a sound which was presumably misheard
> by Anglophones as [kl] to create the word "Klingon" itself. Leaving [k] out
> of a language when that sound occurred at the time in nearly every one of
> its supposed speakers' names was an admittedly cheeky choice, but the
> [tɬ]->[kl] transition is apparently not, as this discussion has made clear,
> an unrealistic one.
> On Thu, Sep 7, 2017 at 14:18 Logan Kearsley <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > On 7 September 2017 at 11:53, Shreyas Sampat <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > >
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_from_
> indigenous_languages_of_the_Americas#Words_from_Nahuatl
> > >
> > > is one list.
> > >
> > > However, not every example here is equally useful for discussion
> because
> > > many of them are secondary borrowings from Spanish (achiote, avocado,
> > etc)
> > > and Nahuatl /tɬ <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA/Nahuatl>/s
> were
> > > reshaped in various ways at the initial borrowing into Sp.
> > >
> > > <atlatl> is maybe the most interesting one from that list but it's a
> > pretty
> > > restricted use word and most times I've heard it in English it sounds
> > like
> > > it syllabifies /at.la.tl=/ which clearly breaks up the tɬ
> > > <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA/Nahuatl> sequences.
> > >
> > > other examples I dug up from a search on OneLook (also pretty
> restricted
> > in
> > > use) include the proper nouns Tlingit and Tlaloc, some Nahuatl
> placenames
> > > in Mexico, and a bunchload of other proper nouns from all over the
> world.
> > > I've seen people trip over Tlingit and Tlaloc often enough to believe
> > that
> > > English speakers are resistant to that sequence in initial position for
> > > phonological reasons and not simply because of a historically motivated
> > but
> > > otherwise accidental gap in the lexicon.
> >
> > In particular, the standard pronunciation of "Tlingit" up in Alaska
> > seems to be "klinkit", which supports the previously-explained theory
> > that "tl" and "kl" clusters are easily confused.
> >
> > -l.
> >
>