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Sorry to sound really critical and rude, but that is THE ugliest mess I
have ever seen. I will refrain from any more comment, sine I have nothing
nice or constructive to say.

Adam

On Tuesday, September 19, 2017, Victor Chan <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I suggest letters for tones because it could be used as input in more
> forms of media other than the keyboard of modern computer. Virtually all
> modern keyboards have 26 Latin alphabet but the more simplistic keyboard,
> like those of old smartphone, may not have diacritics as input. The
> keyboard that have diacritics may placed it in different location from
> other keyboards, which cause problems in public computers, or lack the
> proper diacritics. Furthermore, the diacritics could not be identified
> easily in small print.
> Tone numbers could be used to mark tones and the context could prevent
> confusion. However, I decided to reserve some letters for faster typing in
> some modern cellphone where modifier keys is needed to change between
> number input and letter input.
>
> For the suggestion of tone letters, I would place the tones at the end of
> the syllable to follow the traditional Chinese convention. The tone letters
> will be x, v, w, and j in respective order of the tone numbers. In this
> orthography, ri4 "sun" would be rij and zao3 "morning" would be zaow.
> Adding from my idea for a morpho-phonemic (indicate both pronunciation and
> meaning) alphabet system from the beginning of this month, zaow would be
> zaowRIJ where "RIJ" would indicate a meaning associated with sun (which is
> presented as a compnent in the character of ri4 "sun"). For more example:
> ni3 "you" would be niwRENV and shen2me5 would be shenvmeRENV since the
> "people" (<ren2> in hanyu pinyin which will be <renv> in this proposed
> pinyin) component is used in the character of both words.
>
> On Sun, 17 Sep 2017, "Mike S." wrote:
>
> >Purely out of curiosity, what is your rationale for wanting to use letters
> to mark tones?  In the age of Unicode and computer-aided printing, I
> believe diacritics have come to cause relative few problems, and they're
> the conventional means for marking things like tones in the Latin-alphabet
> tradition.  Unlike tone-letters, diacritics wouldn't cause naive Westerners
> to insert spurious segments into Chinese words, which are already hard
> enough for them to get right.
>
> On Mon, 18 Sep 2017, "Mark J. Reed" wrote:
>
> >I agree that letters for tone seems problematic. IMO, it'd be better to go
> with the old ASCII tradition of sticking a digit after the syllable if you
> are avoiding diacritics for some reason.
>