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I also like the Mongolian script. One day I chanced to look at it sideways and it reminded me a bit of Arabic. Later I learnt that Mongolian Script is ultimately derived from the Aramaic Script. Aramaic being the administrative language of the Persian Empire. A 90 degree shift in writing direction occured under the influence of Chinese.


> On Nov 28, 2017, at 7:27 AM, Space Unicorn J <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> You were right, I could add something like this to my writing system
> CharactersTransliterationNotes
> aloneinitialmedialfinalLatinCyrillicIPA
> ᠠ ᠠ‍ ‍ᠠ‍ ‍ᠠ a а a Distinction usually by vowel harmony (see also *q*/*ɣ*
> and *k*/*g* below)
> ᠡ ᠡ‍ e э e~ə
> ᠢ ᠢ‍ ‍ᠢ‍[note 1]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-11>‍ᠢᠢ‍[note 2]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-12> ‍ᠢ i, yi и,
> й, ы i At end of word today often absorbed into preceding syllable
> ᠣ ᠣ‍ ‍ᠣ‍ ‍ᠣ‍ᠣ᠋ o, u о, у o, ʊ Distinction depending on context.
> ᠥ ᠥ‍ ‍ᠥ‍‍ᠥ᠋‍ ‍ᠥ‍ᠥ᠋ ö, ü ө, ү ɵ~o, u Distinction depending on context.
> ᠨ‍ ‍ᠨ‍[note 3] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-13>
> ‍ᠨ᠋‍[note 4] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-14>
> ‍ᠨ‍ᠨ᠌ n н n Distinction from medial and final *a*/*e* by position in
> syllable sequence.
> ‍ᠩ‍ ‍ᠩ ng н, нг ŋ Only at end of word (medial for composites).
> 
> Transcribes Tibetan ང; Sanskrit ङ.
> ᠪ‍ ‍ᠪ‍ ‍ᠪ‍ᠪ᠋ b б, в b, w In classical Mongolian v is used only for
> transcribing foreign words, so most "В (V)" in Cyrillic Mongolian
> correspond to "Б (B)" in Classical Mongolian.
> ᠫ‍ ‍ᠫ‍ ‍ᠫ p п pʰ Only at the beginning of Mongolian words.
> 
> Transcribes Tibetan པ;
> ᠬ ‍ᠬ‍ ‍ᠬ q х χ Only with back vowels. The "final" version only appears when
> followed by an *a* written detached from the word.
> ᠭ ‍ᠭ‍‍ᠭ᠋‍ ‍ᠭ‍ᠭ᠋ ɣ г ɢ Only with back vowels.
> 
> Between vowels pronounced as a long vowel in oral Mongolian.[note 5]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-15>
> ‍ᠭ᠍‍ ‍ᠭ᠍‍ k х x Only with front vowels, but 'ki/gi' can occur in both front
> and back vowel words
> 
> Word-finally only *g*, not *k*.
> 
> *g* between vowels pronounced as long vowel.[note 6]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-16>
> ‍ᠭ᠌ g г g
> ᠮ‍ ‍ᠮ‍ ‍ᠮ m м m
> ᠯ‍ ‍ᠯ‍ ‍ᠯ l л ɮ~l
> ᠰ‍ ‍ᠰ‍ ‍ᠰ s с s
> ᠱ‍ ‍ᠱ‍ ‍ᠱ š ш ʃ
> ᠲ‍ ‍ᠲ‍‍ᠲ᠋‍ ‍ᠲ t т tʰ Distinction depending on context.
> ᠳ‍ᠳ᠋‍ ‍ᠳ‍‍ᠳ᠋‍ ‍ᠳ d д d
> ᠴ‍ ‍ᠴ‍ ‍ᠴ č ч, ц t͡ʃʰ, t͡sʰ Distinction between /tʃʰ/ and /tsʰ/ in Khalkha
> Mongolian.
> ᠵ‍ ‍ᠵ‍ ‍ᠵ j ж, з d͡ʒ, d͡z Distinction by context in Khalkha Mongolian.
> ᠶ‍ ᠶ‍ y -й, е*, ё*, ю*, я* j
> ᠷ‍ ‍ᠷ‍ ‍ᠷ r р r Not normally at the beginning of words.[note 7]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_script#cite_note-17>
> ᠸ‍ ‍ᠸ‍ ‍ᠸ v в w Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Sanskrit व)
> ᠹ‍ ‍ᠹ‍ ‍ᠹ f ф f Used to transcribe foreign words
> ᠺ ‍ᠺ‍ ‍ᠺ k к kʰ Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Tibetan /g/ ག; Sanskrit ग)
> ᠻ‍ ‍ᠻ‍ ‍ᠻ ḳ к kʰ Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Tibetan /kʰ/ ཁ; Sanskrit ख)
> ᠼ‍ ‍ᠼ‍ ‍ᠼ (c) (ц) t͡sʰ Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Tibetan /ts'/ ཚ; Sanskrit छ)
> ᠽ‍ ‍ᠽ‍ ‍ᠽ (z) (з) d͡z Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Tibetan /dz/ ཛ; Sanskrit ज)
> ᠾ‍ ‍ᠾ‍ ‍ᠾ (h) (г, х) x Used to transcribe foreign words (Originally used to
> transcribe Tibetan /h/ ཧ, ྷ; Sanskrit ह)
> ᠿ‍ (ř) (-,-) ɻ Transcribes Chinese 'ri' - used in Inner Mongolia
> ᡀ‍ ‍ᡀ‍ (lh) (-,-) ɬ Transcribes Tibetan 'lh'
> ᡁ‍ (zh) (-,-) ɖ͡ʐ Transcribes Chinese 'zhi' - used in Inner Mongolia
> ᡂ‍ (chi) (-,-) ʈ͡ʂʰ Transcribes Chinese 'chi' - used in Inner Mongolia
> 
> 2017-11-27 17:23 GMT-06:00 Space Unicorn J <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
>> Thank you all, if you could continue giving ideas I would thank you a lot
>> 
>> 2017-11-27 17:05 GMT-06:00 Matthew George <[log in to unmask]>:
>> 
>>> Perhaps you could consider adding a touch of the Mongolian writing system?
>>> It's not SE Asian, but it feels somewhat similar, and the differences may
>>> provide you with inspiration.  Its calligraphic forms always struck me as
>>> particularly beautiful.
>>> 
>> 
>>