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Walter Sperat wrote:
> Hey everyone!
> Due to a recent thread on which several people listed their ages, and
> having recently watched Conlanging: The Art of crafting Tongues, I got
> curious about the individual stories of the people on this list, i.e. how
> did you get into conlanging?

I started developing my first languages around the time of the first 
Star Wars trilogy. I didn't realize at the time that the alien languages 
were fake (in the sense that there wasn't any real grammar or vocabulary 
to them, just an imitation of a language). Also around that time I 
started reading Tolkien and learning about his Elvish languages. By the 
time Marc Okrand's Klingon Dictionary came out, I already had a pretty 
good start on my conlang collection. I did everything on paper in those 
days. It was a bit of a mess trying to keep track of it all, and most of 
the languages I came up with in those days didn't amount to much. The 
most fully developed of those early languages was actually my first 
conlang, Olaetian. It was a human language spoken on another planet 
(presumably in the far future, but I don't think I ever thought much 
about the timeline). I also had three main Elvish languages (Cythin, 
Rynnan, Alzetjan) which were spoken on a different planet. I don't think 
I thought much about how a fantasy world with dragons and a science 
fiction world with spaceships would coexist in the same universe.

Around the 1990s I shifted the focus of my world-building more to the 
non-human people of the universe. That's also when I started becoming 
aware of other conlangers, mainly through the CONLANG list. Some of the 
prominent languages from that time include ones like Chispa Zaik, a 
language spoken by people from a planet near the star Mizar who evolved 
from rats, and Ziriinka (a.k.a. Simik), spoken by small furry people 
that I called Zireen. I also started up a number of more experimental 
languages, which weren't intended to be actually spoken by anyone, but 
just to play with different grammatical ideas.

In the time since then I've shifted again to focus on a single world, 
Azir, the home world of the Zireen and Sangari people. The other worlds 
still exist as stories; whether they exist in reality and whether 
there's any way to reach them is an open question. This is the world 
where Jarda and Tirëlat are spoken, as well as a few other languages 
that haven't been as active lately.