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Michif in Canada has the verbs from Cree and the nouns from French - 
that's the one I know about.

tylakhlp'f,
Amanda

On Wed, Feb 14, 2018 at 08:21:34AM -0700, Logan Kearsley wrote:
> Suppose you have a substrate language that keeps hold of its own
> native grammar, but steadily replaces all or nearly all of its lexical
> content with borrowed words from some other language.
> 
> And not just syntax, but things like articles, adpositions, and
> inflectional morphology. (The reverse process--borrowing bits of
> morphology--is exemplified-but-worse in the history of English, which
> likes Latin and Greek affixes.)
> 
> The result could be a language which is technically "just a relex" of
> the original substrate language, but in which the lexical roots and
> the surrounding grammatical scaffolding have radically different
> phonological properties--possibly even completely different phonetic
> inventories!
> 
> That alone seems pretty cool to me, but it would certainly also
> provide plenty of opportunities for evolving in interesting ways, thus
> erasing the nature of the original language as a "simple" relex.
> 
> (I recall hearing about a creole where all the verbs came from one
> language, and nouns from another. I suspect somewhere in the
> Caribbean. That's sorta-kinda the same thing.)
> 
> -l.