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I disagree with you on restrictive versus nonrestrictive. Really,
nonrestrictive clauses are parenthetical. So we have:
The kids, who got ice cream, were very happy. (nonrestrictive)
The kids who got ice cream were very happy. (restrictive)
Similarly:
a (calorific) doughnut (nonrestrictive)
a calorific doughnut (restrictive)
a (godless) Commie (nonrestrictive)
a godless kami (restrictive)

On Wed, Feb 28, 2018 at 1:35 PM, And Rosta <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> On 28 February 2018 at 18:07, Logan Kearsley <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> > English has a distinction between restrictive relative clauses (which
> > provide information necessary for identifying the referent, or which
> > restrict the set of possible referents) and non-restrictive relative
> > clauses (which merely provide additional background information on an
> > already-determined referent set). But Russian, for example, does not
> > bother with that distinction. So, while I have no idea what the
> > distribution of this feature in natlangs generally is (there doesn't
> > seem to be a WALS feature for it), there is clearly variation.
> >
> > In contrast, there is no way to distinguish restrictive vs.
> > non-restrictive adjectives (apart from relativizing a predicate
> > adjective clause) in English. So, now I'm wondering, is there any
> > natlang precedent for a regular (either syntactic or morphological)
> > distinction between restrictive and non-restrictive attributive
> > adjectives? If not, is there a conlang precedent known to the List?
> >
>
>
> 1. I haven't studied this question in detail, but my impression is that it
> is somewhat misleading, though usual, to apply to adjectives the
> restrictive--nonrestrictive distinction found in relative clauses. A NRRC
> is predicated of the referent of the modificand -- "an X, which is Y"
> attributes the property of being Y to the particular X referred to, whereas
> nonrestrictive adjectives, such as "a calorific doughnut", "a noxious gust
> of exhaust fumes", attribute to the class of things expressed by the noun
> the property expressed by the adjective.
>
> 2. I recall having seen examples from French or Italian of the prenominal
> or postnominal position of the adjective being correlated with
> restrictiveness (among other semantic properties), the prenominal position
> being the 'nonrestrictive' one and the postnominal the restrictive one, but
> my knowledge of either language is not good enough to offer examples. (I
> don't mean "un vecchio amico" vs "un amico vecchio", which is a different
> distinction.) I mention this only as a prompt to others with better
> knowledge.
>
> --And.
>



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Eyal Joseph Minsky-Fenick
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