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It's the usual way, if the demonstratives function similar to modifiers:
the modifiers come first.

On Thu, Feb 22, 2018 at 5:55 PM, Sylvia Sotomayor <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I have a question regarding word order and OV languages.
>
> The latest draft of the new language is mostly verb-final. The basic word
> order is SOV. The structure of the verb phrase itself is Subject-Proclitic
> - Verb - Inflection. The inflection part codes tense, evidentiality, person
> of subject and person of object. While the subject proclitic marks person
> and number, the inflection only marks person. Also, in some cases the forms
> of the inflections have fallen together, so that without a subject
> proclitic you have no idea if the inflection -ñe means non-past, second
> person subject, no object OR recent past, direct evidentiality, first
> person subject, no object OR recent past, direct evidentiality, third
> person subject with first person object. Since subject and to a certain
> extent object are marked in the verb phrase itself, the actual noun phrases
> for S and O do not have to be expressed.
>
> The language also has copulas, and those come between the copula subject
> and the copula complement.
>
> Within a typical noun phrase, the word order goes: (adjective) noun
> (generic noun) (postposition). I also have demonstratives. My preference is
> to put the demonstrative first: dem adj noun generic. I suspect this is not
> the usual OV language word order. But I like it. Especially when I have
> something like demonstrative relative-clause relative-pronoun noun
> generic-noun resumptive-demonstrative COPULA noun.
>
> So, the question: how unnatural is it to have a demonstrative at the
> beginning of a noun phrase in an OV language? And should I care?
>
> (OK, that last is a rhetorical question).
>
> -S
>
> --
> Sylvia Sotomayor
>
> The sooner I fall behind the more time I have to catch up.
>