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FWIW: https://s.ai/essays/on_the_design_of_an_ideal_language

Note that I premise that one has an axiomatic and infinitely variable
value function, and that there won't be any global optimum across
value functions. I.e., there is no "the".

Sincerely,
Sai
Founder, Language Creation Society


On Fri, Feb 9, 2018 at 11:16 AM, And Rosta <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> On 7 Feb 2018 07:52, "Stewart Fraser" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I have always been aware that that life/mankind is far from perfect. Also I
> have had the feeling that language is the most basic thing that defines
> humanity. It seems to me, if you want to improve something, you must start
> at the bottom : you must build up the way. Hence my quest for a “perfect”
> language.
>
> Now I know the above is not logical (as misguided as Zamenhof’s idea that a
> common language would prevent war), but nevertheless it’s how I feel.
>
>
> My interest in conlanging (or at least my own) has been similarly driven by
> the quest for a "perfect" language (I can remember a line I wrote in my
> twenties in a poem in homage to Anthony Burgess or the poet Nicholas Moore,
> "inventing a beltistolaly, / tinkering its gist croquised / while
> flourishing a cavalierly / pennoned euphrasy cockade", where 'beltistolaly'
> must be meant to mean an optimal tongue). Like most of us, I have the
> intuitive understanding that language is phenomenologically fundamental to
> our lifeworld, and also that it is a tool. Pretty much any tool is capable
> of improvement; there can always be a design better fitted to fulfilling
> the function of the tool. So this conviction of language's importance and
> improvability sends me on the quest for a perfect language.
>
> I don't in the least feel that the quest is misguided, and I still feel
> that it is of potentially great value to humanity; but also I feel that as
> time goes on, the task of making any progress in the quest seems harder and
> harder. The computational capacity of the human mind seems an insuperable
> limitation that dooms any human language to reproachful imperfection. And
> we have yet to fully uncover the inner workings of any natural language,
> and it is hybristic to suppose that we can design a tool better than one
> whose inner workings we only glimpse but which has been honed by a sort of
> natural selection. I've spent my life studying English, which experience
> suffuses me more with the desire to understand its workings better than to
> discard it in favour of something better.
>
> --And.