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It depends on how idiomatic you want to get. Technically, when "the baby
cried for its mother," mother could be treated as a benefactive clause.
However, your conlang could easily lump that in with the dative to add a
sexy irregularity. For example, English makes no distinction between the
comitative and instrumentive cases, so this isn't unprecedented.

On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 7:23 AM, C. Brickner <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> First of all, no question is dumb. if the asker is not familiar with the
> subject.
> This is from the Wikipedia article "Object (grammar)": One rule of thumb
> for English, however, is that an indirect object is not present unless a
> direct object is also present.
> "He gave the book to you". "He gave you the book". But not *"He gave you".
> "Cry" is not usually transitive but, "He cried many tears for you".
> However, not *"He cried you many tears".
> Other members may be giving you a better grammatical analysis.
> Charlie
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Michael Martin <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Fri, 27 Apr 2018 23:37:35 -0400 (EDT)
> Subject: Re: Verb Objects
>
> Isn't that what an indirect object is? When a preposition is used?
>
> You have to realize I have no linguistics education beyond the basics
> taught in school and that's mostly long forgotten.
>
> I'm just not sure how to recognize indirect objects versus no objects.
>
> Sorry if it seems like a dumb question.
>
> * Michael - [log in to unmask]
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]> On Behalf
> Of C. Brickner
> Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 6:51 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Verb Objects
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Michael Martin <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Fri, 27 Apr 2018 20:48:18 -0400 (EDT)
> Subject: Verb Objects
>
> >My question is, can there be a sentence with no direct object but that
> does have indirect objects? Like in the sentence "He cried for you" is
> "you" the direct object or an indirect object? My word for the >verb cry is
> "yanir" so "he cried..." is "priyana-" ("pri-" makes it past tense, and
> "-a-" indicates subject is third person singular), but which object suffix
> do I use? "-kei" for second person singular, or "-kev" >for no direct
> object?
>
> I should think that "you" is the object of the preposition "for".
> He cried instead of you - He cried so you wouldn't have to.
> He cried because he missed you - The baby cried for his mother.
> Charlie
>