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Post it on Steemit, maybe get paid for it.

stevo

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 7:27 AM, Aidan Aannestad <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> On 2018/04/26 17:10, David Peterson wrote:
>
>> Aidan, please do let us put it up on Fiat Lingua! Your article is the
>> current one, but it's not like this would be the next one. lol Unlike in
>> recent years, we've got a LONG queue. Your article might not even go up
>> this *year*. Anyway, if you're getting comments, you can just revise and
>> submit later.
>>
> Well, if you're fine with a work that's really very derivative, then I
> will submit it! I'll finish it and clean it up and then email it to you.
>
>>
>> Also, since this is a hugely underused feature of Fiat Lingua, YOU CAN
>> REVISE AN ARTICLE THAT'S ALREADY UP! We keep and track every version.
>> Every
>> article gets a six digit hexadecimal number, but after that is a two digit
>> hexadecimal number that tells you the version—and we list every version on
>> the page, while linking to the most recent version in the main
>> description.
>> I imagined when I started Fiat Lingua that when you pulled up any given
>> article they'd all have between four and nine different versions, with the
>> article improving each time. It was also supposed to encourage people to
>> submit (i.e. it didn't matter if it wasn't perfect the first time; you
>> could fix it and upload the new version later—without losing the insights
>> of the original draft since it would still be there!) It hasn't worked out
>> that way, though. I think people like to submit and be done with it—and
>> that's totally fine, but just FYI it is set up to do versions!
>>
> I've been considering doing that with my current one, but I've realised
> that many of the changes I might make would require me to rewrite the whole
> thing - something I'm not all that interested in doing! :P I've got a
> couple changes I might still make, though, so thanks for the reminder.
>
> -David
>>
>> On Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 2:11 PM, Aidan Aannestad <[log in to unmask]>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I've written a rather long thing (fifteen full pages in Google Docs) about
>>> lexical typology - https://docs.google.com/docume
>>> nt/d/13EfxlxUSGctXuE_vRGiTYXrqYOBC07TmWSRfY_mXU_I/edit?usp=sharing. It's
>>> not fully complete (there's two sections left to write, and I'd like to
>>> polish and reformat it in LaTeX eventually), but I'd love some comments
>>> on
>>> it now anyway. (The document is set up to allow anyone to comment right
>>> on
>>> it, if you want to.)
>>>
>>> The introduction explains it better than I can in any other way -
>>>
>>> "This article is largely an attempt to break down, process and
>>> regurgitate
>>> the contents of Leonard Talmy’s article ‘Lexical Typologies’ in /Language
>>> Typology and Syntactic Description, volume 3//./ I bought this book on
>>> recommendation from the Conlanger’s Library for totally different
>>> reasons,
>>> and this particular article has blown my mind so wide open that I had to
>>> sit down and rewrite its contents for myself to even begin to wrap my
>>> head
>>> around the whole new world it’s presented to me. I’ve largely kept to the
>>> structure of his article, but I’ve inserted comments relevant to
>>> conlanging
>>> here and there, and added some natlang examples from my own experience
>>> and
>>> reading. Hopefully this rewriting proves as helpful to others to read as
>>> it
>>> is to me to write - and certainly, the information here is
>>> revolutionising
>>> my conlanging. There are huge opportunities here for extremely inventive
>>> and deeply flavourful conlanging, in ways that have to the best of my
>>> knowledge have remained mostly unexplored so far. "
>>>
>>> I'm not quite sure what to do with this article, honestly. I don't have a
>>> personal website to upload it to, and I've submitted to Fiat Lingua so
>>> recently that my article is still the current issue (plus, this one is a
>>> reprocessing of someone else's article and not by any means an original
>>> creation). I probably ought to get a personal website at some point, if I
>>> keep doing these things, though! If I don't, though, I'm not sure where
>>> to
>>> put it - I'd welcome suggestions!
>>>
>>>