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I just agreed to help out with TEI encoding of a liturgy project. If list
members could provide links to examples of TEI used for liturgical texts
and/or schemas for the same that would be most appreciated. Thank you.
All best,
Dan


On Mon, Apr 3, 2017 at 1:51 PM Paul Schaffner <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> I have raised this question before, back when we were encoding
> lots of variants on the Englsh and Latin prayer books. We never did
> find a wholly satisfactory encoding for liturgical texts, partly because
> they are so various amongst themselves (what works for one will
> not necessarily work for another), and partly because they can be
> so various within a single text: the div-level organization can be
> very confusing, without any clear hierarchy, with one labelled chunk
> succeeding another without evident organization; within these
> chunks, once finds a mixture of (often unmarked and often abbreviated)
> 'rubrics' (i.e, instructions, or narratives that serve in place of
> instructions;
> descriptions of alternative versions, etc.); readings, often in the
> form of quotations or centos of quotations; prayers, sometimes
> in the form of litanies, sometimes not; call-and-response type
> structures
> (antiphons); hymns; etc., all rather jumbled together.
>
> Most of the time, when the format supported it, we opted for
> dramatic tags: <speaker> for  "Priest:"  "People:"; <stage>
> for rubrics (instructions); and <sp> for short direct speeches.
> But this structure could not be maintained, since dramatically
> formatted text would immediately give way to (say)
>
> Lectio IV.
>
> or
>
> PRAYER.
> ...
>
> which might or might not be spoken by the same person who had
> just been given a <sp> tag. Leading one to doubt whether to
> create a new div at that point; or a floating text within the
> currently open <sp>, or something different altogether.  We might
> start tagging rubrics as <stage>, then find a rubric that turned into
> a multi-page commentary, for which <stage> seemed very
> awkward at best.
>
> In a word, though we used the drama tags, and supported
> their semantic appropriateness, the actual structure of the documents
> invariably seemed to make them problematic to apply, or to
> apply consistently or confidently. I think in the end we would have
> done better to have used a much more generic div/p/seg structure
> -- though that has its problems too.
>
> pfs
>
> On Mon, Apr 3, 2017, at 14:21, Lou Burnard wrote:
> > Well, yes, <seg> CAN be used like that, to cover all sorts of edge
> > cases. (Though you may find it needs to be wrapped up in a <p> or
> > something similar).
> > But if you;re interested in marking up the liturgy semantically, why not
> > do the job properly, using <sp> and <p> and <lg> for the various
> > scripted parts, and <stage> for the "directions" ? Alternatively, you
> > could use <note>, perhaps with a @type attribute to indicate that it's
> > an instruction. Either of these options has the advantage that it can
> > appear within or between paragraphs.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 03/04/17 16:57, Hayim Lapin wrote:
> > >
> > > Hello all,
> > >
> > > A colleague working on liturgical texts (in fact, seasonably
> > > appropriate: the text for the passover seder) asked how her group
> > > might encode liturgical instructions ("here the cup is raised"; "In X
> > > circumstances the following is recited").
> > >
> > > I suggested <seg> using @type and @subtype attributes as necessary to
> > > specify further.  However, my guess is that there are people on this
> > > list who have far more experience than me with this sort of thing.
> > >
> > > Any suggestions?
> > > Many thanks,
> > > --
> > > Hayim Lapin
> > > Professor of History
> > > Robert H. Smith Professor of Jewish Studies
> > > 2115 Francis Scott Key Hall
> > > College Park, MD 20190
> > > +1 301 405 4296
> > > www.digitalmishnah.umd.edu  |www.erabbinica.org
> >
> >
> --
> Paul Schaffner  Digital Content & Collections
> University of Michigan Libraries
> [log in to unmask] | http://www.umich.edu/~pfs/
>


-- 
Dr. Daniel L. Schwartz
Associate Professor of History
Associate Director of the The Center of Digital Humanities Research
<http://codhr.dh.tamu.edu/>

Texas A&M University
4213 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-4213

*Paideia and Cult <http://chs.harvard.edu/CHS/article/display/5813>:
Christian Initiation in Theodore of Mopsuestia* (Center for Hellenic
Studies, 2013)
http;//syriaca.org
<http://syriaca.org/>