Print

Print


I hate to say it, but it depends...on what schema language you’re using.  Because of the issues outlined here https://github.com/TEIC/TEI/issues/1344, whether your dating system has a year zero or not will depend on whether you use Relax NG (no year zero) or XML Schema (has year zero). If there is a year zero, (CE) centuries should be X00-X99. It’s my sense that most TEI rely on Relax NG.

And, yes, this is completely bonkers.

Hugh

> On Oct 31, 2018, at 6:41 AM, James Cowey <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Which (101-200 = 2nd century AD; 201-300 = 3rd century AD) is what the project
> 
> http://papyri.info
> 
> has been using since 2010
> 
> e.g.
> 
> http://papyri.info/ddbdp/bgu;1;75
> 
> here is the relevant section
> 
> https://github.com/papyri/idp.data/blob/master/HGV_meta_EpiDoc/HGV29/28219.xml#L34
> 
> all the best
> 
> James
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Zitat von Franz Fischer <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
>>> Am 30.10.2018 um 23:07 schrieb Paul Schaffner:
>>> For ease of conversion, I would regard "13th century" as = "12[0-9][0-9]"
>> It's easier but not correct. The 13th cent. lasted from 1st of January
>> 1201 through 31 December 1300.
>>> As for the quarters and halves, I suppose consistency demands
>>> that I take first quarter to be 1200-1224 etc.
>> Same here, it starts and ends one year later.
>> 
>> Franz
>>> Though I don't know
>>> that I do.
>>> 
>>> The Middle English Dictionary is inconsistent in applying its
>>> policy about 'circa' and 'ante' but its stated policy is
>>> 
>>> a1400 = 1375-1400
>>> ?a1400 = ?1375-1400
>>> c1450 = 1425-1475 (i.e. 50 years, more or less: probably should be -1474)
>>> ?c1450 = ?1425-?1475
>>> 
>>> Then there are those who use
>>> s.15in, s.15ex, and s.15 1/3,  s.15 2/4,  s.15 med, etc.
>>> I often have to guess when converting those to MED dates unless
>>> the author or publisher has a stated or standing explanation.
>>> 
>>> pfs
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>> On Tue, Oct 30, 2018, at 17:02, Matthew James Driscoll wrote:
>>>> Dear all,
>>>> 
>>>> Sorry (really) to bring the subject up again, but I just wanted to ask
>>>> what the general feeling was as regards converting centuries and parts
>>>> thereof to @notBefore and @notAfter dates (when dating manuscripts). So,
>>>> does "13th century" mean:
>>>> 
>>>> a)       1201-1300
>>>> 
>>>> b)      1200-1299
>>>> 
>>>> c)       1200-1300
>>>> By parts thereof I obviously mean things like "the first quarter of the
>>>> 13th century"; does that start at 1200 or 1201 etc.?
>>>> And how, dare I ask, ought one to interpret "circa"? +/- 5, 10, 15, 25
>>>> years?
>>>> All answers gratefully received. (I realise it does, but please don't
>>>> say "it depends".)
>>>> 
>>>> Best,
>>>> Matthew
>>>> 
>>>> M. J. Driscoll
>>>> Professor of Old Norse Philology
>>>> 
>>>> University of Copenhagen
>>>> Institute for Nordic Studies and Linguistics
>>>> Arnamagnæan Institute
>>>> Njalsgade 136
>>>> DK-2300 Copenhagen S
>>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Dr. Franz Fischer
>> Cologne Center for eHumanities
>> Universität zu Köln, Universitätsstr. 22, D-50923 Köln
>> +49 - (0)221 - 470 - 4056
>> [log in to unmask]
>> @vranzvischer
>> 
>> cceh.uni-koeln.de, dixit.uni-koeln.de
>> i-d-e.de, ride.i-d-e.de
>> digitalmedievalist.org, journal.digitalmedievalist.org
>> guillelmus.uni-koeln.de, confessio.ie