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On Sun, Dec 2, 2018, at 10:13 PM, Alex Fink wrote:
> On Sun, 2 Dec 2018 at 02:05, Stewart Fraser <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > As for “gullwing”, well it is definitely an adjective to me. I have only ever heard it in the context “gullwing door” so it can not be otherwise.
> 
> Er, sorry to let my pedant out on the least interesting part of this
> conversation, but that's the claim I was trying to answer.  If a
> mystery word "gullwing" really could only appear in the context
> "gullwing door", (and morphology gave us no clues,) then we wouldn't
> have enough information to tell if it was a noun or an adjective, and
> we shouldn't make the call yet.  In syntax it could be an adjective,
> making the phrase parallel to "wooden door", or it could be a noun,
> making it parallel to "wood door".  As these two examples illustrate
> semantics doesn't help you.
> 
> To support that it is (or can be) an adjective one would want to show
> that it can take part in a construction that is unique to adjectives.
> Maybe degree modification or comparison?  "This is a very gullwing
> door"?  "This door is more gullwing than that one"?

"I have to go to the mechanics, because now I have a gullwed door"