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 I write very badly when I accelerate and when my writing becomes cursive,
I almost do not form letters and it is more of a drawing, of a profile of
the written word than of a real alphabetic writing.
Difficult to read, even for me sometimes ...
and I sometimes have to pay the price ...
maybe that's why my conscript is very detached and logographic ...

have a pic for the day... <https://odd-language.tumblr.com/>


Le mar. 21 mai 2019 à 10:56, Rebecca Bettencourt <[log in to unmask]> a
écrit :

> I draw my t's and lowercase r's "backwards." That is, I draw the crossbar
> of the t first, right to left, then the stem, top to bottom. I draw the
> curve of the r first, right to left, then the stem, bottom to top. Here:
>
> http://www.kreativekorp.com/epsilon/frm/tibwriting.png
>
> (That's my k, r, t, and the four different ways I write y.)
>
> Not that exciting, I guess, but it does really confuse handwriting
> recognition software, which assumes these letters are written the "correct"
> way (stem first top-to-bottom with the bar/curve left-to-right). Except
> Google's handwriting recognition, which they crowdsourced handwriting
> samples for (including several hundred of mine).
>
> -- Rebecca Bettencourt
>
>
> On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:43 AM Kevin Walker <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> > Do any of you have a more-eccentric-than-usual style of handwriting?  A
> > rationale behind it?  Perhaps used in youth only?  Speaking here not so
> > much of full-on conscripts as personal ways of transcribing your L1, used
> > in place of the regularly in place of the standard, e.g., I can't do
> > cursive, but I try to turn every sound into a single stroke of the pen,
> > including digraphs, usually by turning h's into vertical strokes attached
> > to the rightmost point of the letter.
> >
> > I know that in my case some of the first ways I was creative about
> language
> > was in my own handwriting.  I definitely know of people who took pride in
> > weird shorthands but weren't to the best of my knowledge conlangers.  I
> > assume therefore that it's the same for at least some of us, but also
> > perhaps not something we think of as conlanging proper.  I also suspect
> it
> > is not so monumental a task that a starting conlanger cannot have a
> result
> > of which they will remain pretty proud.  So do you have any
> conhandwritings
> > of which you are proud?  Ashamed?
> >
>