Print

Print


Or you can do comparative work and look at how well cultural traits like
shared mythological elements inherited from a distant common ancestor do
over millennia. Think for example such distant relatives as Finnic and
Samoyedic or Celtic and Indic. If you do your homework, you will find
shared elements in their mythologies that are still recognisable after all
that time, but you'll also notice that these are heavily mixed with other
material that draws from unrelated sources. In other words, the fact that
you can find inherited cultural similarities over long distances doesn't
mean that it would be a simple task to do.

   -Jyri


ke 15. toukok. 2019 klo 20.29 Jörg Rhiemeier ([log in to unmask])
kirjoitti:

> Hallo conlangers!
>
> On 15/05/19 14:02, Jyri Lehtinen wrote:
>
> > Think of it like this. Both language and culture are carried by real
> living
> > people, so there's going to be at least local correlation between the
> both
> > of them and population genetics. But it's equally true that we don't
> learn
> > either our language or our culture solely from our family and both of
> these
> > can in fact undergo quite drastic shifts. Moreover, since cultural
> > practices tend to diffuse more readily than language, you can't make a
> > one-to-one connection between the shifts in language and culture. Over
> time
> > you will then loose the connection between linguistic kinship and the
> > shared cultural heritage.
>
> Yes - there are sufficient examples of peoples with similar cultures but
> dissimilar languages and vice versa. Consider your own people, the Finns
> - linguistically more closely affiliated with the Saami than the Swedes,
> but culturally more similar to the Swedes than the Saami.
>
> --
> ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
> http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
>