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----------------------------Original message----------------------------
 
   Date: Fri, 2 Oct 92 20:05:16 +0100
   From: Keld J|rn Simonsen <[log in to unmask]>
 
   For the Japanese/Chinese input: well today it is much used in
   those countries to type in the information in latin characters,
   or in Hiragana, because having a full Han/Kanji keyboard is
   just unmanageable. I understand that at least the Japanese are
   quite happy with this method. This is very similar to typing in
   a short identifier.
 
No, I'm afraid this won't work.  One cannot simply type out the Romaji
or Kana representation of Japanese, the Pinyin or Zhuyin representation
of Chinese, or the Hangul representation of Korean, and use that as
a shorthand for the Han characters which possess such pronunciations.
The mapping from these pronunciations to Han characters is one to many,
e.g., one of my smaller Chinese dictionaries, Han-ying cidian, has over
100 characters which correspond to the syllable YI.  There are a few
Han character name conventions in use, e.g., the Chinese Telegraph Code,
wherein operators a memorize 4-digit number for each character.  But this
is quite impractical these days.
 
   So I do not think the inputting of character names for characters
   is absurd, this is very similar to what is in wide use all over
   the world today.
 
I think this is a leap of faith on your part and not corroborated at
all by any evidence.  I am familiar with word processors which are used
in India, in the Middle East, in Southeast Asia (Thailand, Burma, Vietnam),
those of Korea, China, and Japan, and in no case do I know one instance
where a word processor represents characters by means of their names,
nor do I know of any process by which users (simply) enter the names of
characters.  [Han input methods are not merely the entry of character names;
they require significant user interaction to select the appropriate character
from an ambiguous name].
 
Glenn Adams